How To Install Yafaray Under Linux

One of the computing subtopics I dabble in, is the acquisition of 3D-graphics software. Therefore, I already have “Blender 2.78a”, which has its own built-in software-rendering engine, and I have several other rendering engines installed on my Linux-based computers.

Further, the rendering engines by themselves can be useless, unless they integrate well with a GUI (such as with Blender). And so one undertaking which I’ll typically reach with a given computer, is to install “Yafaray”, which used to be ‘Yafray’, which stood for ‘Yet Another Free Ray-Tracer’. If it’s installed properly, Blender can render its scenes, using Yafaray, but from within Blender.

Yafray used to be a much simpler piece of software to install than it has become. But I’m sure the effort I put into it this evening, will be well-worth it eventually. What I’m used to doing is to download a source-tree, and if it’s CMake-based, to run ‘cmake-gui‘ on it, to custom-pick my build options, and to go. But as it happens with Yafaray, this approach led to near chaos. What this did, was to compile all the source-code properly into libraries, but then to install those libraries to nonsensical locations within my system folders. One reason was the fact that a part of the project was to create Python 3 bindings, and another was the need for the Blender-integration, where modern Blender versions are based on Python 3. In any case I was sure to install all the build dependencies via my package-manager, but doing so was not enough to obtain working outcomes.

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Continue reading How To Install Yafaray Under Linux

Wings 3D Has a GUI Problem on my builds of Linux.

In keeping with my recent theme, of testing various 3D editing applications available under Linux, I next tried out “Wings3D”, which is available in the Debian repositories / package manager.

And one detail which I found frustrating, was that some of the dialog boxes – if not all of them – have problems displaying correctly on the current build of Linux.

I get the impression that Wings3D is actually quite powerful. But unless the Right-Mouse-Button (‘RMB’) clicks reveal their full Context Menus, it can be hard to get started with this application.

There was just a specific exercise which I undertook this evening, which was to try assigning a custom material – and therefore an arbitrary texture image – to an arbitrary 3D model, even in a situation where the texture image made no sense, just to get a feel for how it’s done. While getting started with this, I learned that objects must be U,V-mapped first – which is actually nothing new. And, advanced 3D editors such as Wings3D, do have a semi-automatic U,V-mapping option. The trick is for a person who has never used Wings3D before – actually to find it!

We can select a model to work on, and then we’re supposed to RMB, and from the context-menu, pick the ‘UV-Editor’. The problem with my build of Linux is, that the last entry of the context-menu is actually this option, and it doesn’t display correctly! Instead, in its place, all we get to see is a dot. When I’m looking for a UV-Editor option in a context-menu, to UV-Edit a specific model, I don’t usually think, that the entry which is actually displaying As A Dot – Is It.

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Once I discovered this detail, I was able to make progress by trial-and-error.

There is a way for users in general to make out the entries in the Wings3D context menus, that are not being displayed correctly, and that is to hover over those entries, and to observe what the bottom, green bar tells us. It will update, and display information about how to use the menu-entry being hovered over – including what that entry is called ! :-D

Dirk

(Edit 08/24/2017 : )

I solved this problem, by upgrading to the latest version of the application.

For Debian / Jessie, the package manager only offers version 1.5.3 . But we can actually install version 2.1.5 quite well, from the Web-site.

 

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