One method to convert Text to SVG-File.

The problem can exist, that we want to import text into an application, which nevertheless expects a graphics file, but that the application is strong enough to accept SVG-Files as an available graphics-file format.

In studying this problem, I came to a discovery which was new to me about what SVG-Files are. In fact, SVG is a markup-language similar to HTML or to XML, so that by default, SVG-Files are actually text-files ! This also means, that if our Web-authoring software offers to embed SVG, this is not done with an <embed> -tag, as if the file was to be treated as some sort of image, but rather, using an actual <svg> -tag.

The main difference in SVG-Files would seem to be, that they prepend an <xml> -tag, making the file a self-contained document.

What this also means, is that text can be converted into SVG-Files most-efficiently, using a text-editor, where we’d first set up a template, then copy that to a new file-name every time we need a working SVG-File, and then just edit the text…

The following is a type of template which has worked for me, in experiments I carried out:


<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="no"?>

  Instructions for Windows users:
  This file will probably need to be renamed
  From: Template.svg.txt (where .txt was hidden)
  To:   Template.svg
  And then placed in a folder with other images.
  A console window would need to be navigated to
  the same directory...

  Linux Usage:
  cp Template.svg TextFile.svg
  edit text/*:TextFile.svg
  Windows Usage:
  copy Template.svg TextFile.svg (Hypothetical Name)
  Notepad TextFile.svg
  For either Linux or Windows,
  assuming Inkscape is installed and in the PATH:
  inkscape -z -e TextFile.svg.png TextFile.svg

  inkscape -z -T -l TextFile-G.svg TextFile.svg


<svg height="90" width="200">
    <text x="10" y="15" style="fill:black;"
        font-size="12" font-family="Liberation">Several lines:
      <tspan x="10" dy="15">Second line.</tspan>
      <tspan x="10" dy="15">Third line.</tspan>


One assumption made in creating this template was, that Inkscape is installed in such a way, as to recognize the stated font-family. This parameter can just be omitted, in which case Inkscape would use whatever its default font is. But, to state such information provides consistent, predictable results. In contrast, I needed to set the font-size. Inkscape could default to an unexpected font-size, which in turn would lead to garbled output, in the resulting PNG-File. And, the default font-size Inkscape uses, appears to be the one last-set when the GUI was used.

(Edit 03/15/2018 :

By now, this template only serves as a working basis, for a shell-script I have written, which allows me to create such text-images with a single command. I have posted the script to my blog. But, if readers are nevertheless interested in understanding the workings of SVG-Files, I’m always leaving my existing ruminations as written blow… )

Continue reading One method to convert Text to SVG-File.

Revisiting HTML, this time, With CSS.

When I first taught myself HTML, it was in the 1990s, and not only has the technology advanced, but the philosophy behind Web-design has also changed. The original philosophy was, that the Web-page should only contain the information, and that each Web-browser should define in what style that information should be displayed. But of course, when Cascading Style-Sheets were invented – which in today’s laconic vocabulary are just referred to as “Styles” – they represented a full reversal of that philosophy, since by nature, they control the very appearance of the page, from the server.

My own knowledge of HTML has been somewhat limited. I’ve bought cuspy books about ‘CSS’ as well as about ‘JQuery’, but have never made the effort to read each book from beginning to end. I mainly focused on what some key concepts are, in HTML5 and CSS.

Well recently I’ve become interested in HTML5 and CSS again, and have found, that to buy the Basic license of a WYSIWYG-editor named “BlueGriffon“, proved informative. I do have access to some open-source HTML editors, but find that even if they come as a WYSIWIG-editor, they mainly tend to produce static pages, very similar to what Web-masters were already creating in the 1990s. In the open-source domain, maybe a better example would be “SeaMonkey“. Beyond that, ‘KompoZer‘ can no longer be made to run on up-to-date 64-bit systems, and while “BlueFish”, a pronouncedly KDE-centric solution available from the package-manager, does offer advanced capabilities, it only does so in the form of an IDE.

(Updated 03/09/2018, 17h10 : )

Continue reading Revisiting HTML, this time, With CSS.