Revisiting HTML, this time, With CSS.

When I first taught myself HTML, it was in the 1990s, and not only has the technology advanced, but the philosophy behind Web-design has also changed. The original philosophy was, that the Web-page should only contain the information, and that each Web-browser should define in what style that information should be displayed. But of course, when Cascading Style-Sheets were invented – which in today’s laconic vocabulary are just referred to as “Styles” – they represented a full reversal of that philosophy, since by nature, they control the very appearance of the page, from the server.

My own knowledge of HTML has been somewhat limited. I’ve bought cuspy books about ‘CSS’ as well as about ‘JQuery’, but have never made the effort to read each book from beginning to end. I mainly focused on what some key concepts are, in HTML5 and CSS.

Well recently I’ve become interested in HTML5 and CSS again, and have found, that to buy the Basic license of a WYSIWYG-editor named “BlueGriffon“, proved informative. I do have access to some open-source HTML editors, but find that even if they come as a WYSIWIG-editor, they mainly tend to produce static pages, very similar to what Web-masters were already creating in the 1990s. In the open-source domain, maybe a better example would be “SeaMonkey“. Beyond that, ‘KompoZer‘ can no longer be made to run on up-to-date 64-bit systems, and while “BlueFish”, a pronouncedly KDE-centric solution available from the package-manager, does offer advanced capabilities, it only does so in the form of an IDE.

(Updated 03/09/2018, 17h10 : )

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Google Pixel C does not have NEON.

I have been thoroughly enjoying my Google Pixel C, which I ordered only recently, and which I ordered because the actual tablet I have been using before, was only a first-generation Samsung Galaxy Tab S.

Sometimes we obtain many new features, but also at the expense of losing some feature. Because the ARM CPU is a RISC-Chip, the manufacturers of Android devices have sometimes made up for this by including a coprocessor called NEON. NEON is an SIMD – a Single-Instruction, Multiple-Data – coprocessor – aka a Vector-Processor, which is often useful to allow the decoding of high-definition video streams in real-time, without placing the burden of doing so on the main CPU.

(Edit 04/08/2017 : I have given my own definition of what “Hardware Acceleration” means, Here. )

What has happened with the Pixel C, is that Google has decided to put a Tegra X1 CPU into it, which is an SoC that also has a big coprocessor – its mighty GPU. With this tablet, real-time video-decoding is meant to be performed by the GPU, which advertizes several system-installed Codecs. Therefore, watching videos in high definition should not require a NEON coprocessor, and the Tegra X1 does not have one. (And, when I scroll further down the list of Codecs, that list includes two of the corresponding Encoders, from Nvidia, not only the Decoders. )

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In fact, the Pixel C only has a 4-core main CPU!

Continue reading Google Pixel C does not have NEON.