Testing of USB Sound Device Complete.

According to my previous posting, I needed to do a more thorough test of the USB Sound Card I have bought, which is a “Focusrite Scarlett 2i2“.

In particular, I needed to address the discrepancy according to which, the Linux JACK daemon reports capture at 32 bits, while the specifications of the sound card state a 24 bit sample format.

Also, I needed to be sure whether it would run as well at 96 kHz, as it already did at 48 kHz.

According to my more complete test, the 32-bit sample-format which ‘QJackCtl‘ shows me, which can be viewed in its Messages box, state the ALSA parameters and not the JACK internals. Therefore, JACK has after all chosen to capture and/or play back audio at a physical 32 bits, at the 96 kHz sample-rate. This is not, after all, a statement of the JACK internal behavior.

Since I am using Linux, and since the manufacturer chose to rate this capture device as only being capable of 24-bit capture, I must assume that for hardware reasons the device uses 32-bit registers, but that only the first, most-significant 24 of those bits are accurate. Therefore, when I open ‘QTractor‘ – the Digital Audio Workstation / Tracker application, it is best to truncate its capture format to 24 bits as well, which is most probably what the Windows or Mac drivers for this device do.

Aside from that, using QTractor next, to capture a 96 kHz, 24-bit, stereo FLAC file was easy and uneventful. Further, the stability of my software suggests that I can play with the GUIs as much as I need to, to figure them out, and I will not screw anything up.

After I closed JACK, I next imported this FLAC file, that plays for 14 seconds, into “Audacity“, which has been set up to use the default sound settings (‘PulseAudio‘), and which performs an on-demand re-sampling of the FLAC file.

The on-demand FLAC playback is not filtered well by Audacity, but since it is running at 96 kHz, compared with the 44.1 kHz that the internal sound of the laptop runs at, this observation is not surprising.

And then the captured sound clip simply contains, what I spoke into my microphone.

Dirk