Is it valid that audio equipment from the 1970s sound better than modern equipment?

I’ve written about this before.

That depends on which piece of audio equipment from the 1970s, is being compared with which piece of equipment from today.

If the equipment consists of a top-quality turntable from the late 1970s, compared to the most basic MP3-player from today, and if we assume for the moment that the type of sound file which is being played on the Portable Audio Player, is in fact an MP3 File recorded at a bit-rate of 128kbps, then the answer would be Yes. Top-quality turntables from the late 1970s were able to outperform that.

OTOH, If the audio equipment from today is a Digital Audio Player, that boasts 24-bit sound, that only happens to be able to play MP3 Files, but that is in fact playing a FLAC File, then it becomes very difficult for even the better audio equipment from the 1970s to match that.

Top-Quality Audio Equipment from the late 1970s, would have cost over $1000 for one component, without taking into account, how many dollars that would have been equivalent to today. The type of Digital Audio Player I described cost me C$ 140.- plus shipping, plus handling, in 2018.

Also, there is a major distinction, between any sort of equipment which is only meant to reproduce an Electronic signal, and equipment which is Electromechanical in nature, including speakers, headphones, phonographs… ‘The old Electromechanical technology’ was very good, except for the basic limitation, that they could not design good bass-reflex speakers, which require computers to design well. With no bass-reflex speakers, the older generations tended to listen to stereo on bigger, expensive speakers. But their sound was good, with even bass.

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A Thought on SRS

Today, when we buy a laptop, we assume that its internal speakers offer inferior sound by themselves, but that through the use of a feature named ‘SRS’, they are enhanced, so that sound which simply comes from two speakers in front of us, seems to fill the space around us, kind of how surround-sound would work.

The immediate problem with Linux computers is, that they do not offer this enhancement. However, technophiles have known for a long time that this problem can be solved.

The underlying assumption here is, that the stereo being sent to the speakers should act as if each channel was sent to one ear in an isolated way, as if we were using headphones.

The sound that leaves the left speaker, reaches our right ear with a slightly longer time-delay, than the time-delay with which it reaches our left ear, and a converse truth exists for the right speaker.

It has always been possible to time-delay and attenuate the sound that came from the left speaker in total, before subtracting the result from the right speaker-output, and vice-verso. That way, the added signal that reaches the left ear from the left speaker, cancels with the sound that reached it from the right speaker…

The main problem with that effect, is that it will mainly seem to work when the listener is positioned in front of the speakers, in exactly one position.

I have just represented a hypothetical setup in the time-domain. There can exist a corresponding representation in the frequency-domain. The only problem is, that this effect cannot truly be achieved just with one graphical equalizer setting, because it affects (L+R) differently from how it affects (L-R). (L+R) would be receiving some recursive, negative reverb, while (L-R) would be receiving some recursive, positive reverb. But reverb can also be expressed by a frequency-response curve, as long as that has sufficiently fine resolution.

This effect will also work well with MP3-compressed stereo, because with Joint Stereo, an MP3 stream is spectrally complex in its reproduction of the (L-R) component.

I expect that when companies package SRS, they do something similar, except that they may tweak the actual frequency-response curves into something simpler, and they may also incorporate a compensation, for the inferior way the speakers reproduce frequencies.

Simplifying the curves would allow the effect to break down less, when the listener is not perfectly positioned.

We do not have it under Linux.

(Edit 02/24/2017 : A related effect is possible, by which 2 or more speakers are converted into an effectively-directional speaker-system. I.e., the intent could be, that sound which reaches our filter as the (L) channel, should predominantly leave the speaker-set at one angle, while sound which reaches our filter as the (R) channel, should leave the speaker-set at an opposing angle.

In fact, if we have an entire array of speakers – i.e. a speaker-bar – then we can apply the same sort of logic to them, as we would apply to a phased-array radar system.

The main difference with such a system, as opposed to one based on the Inter-Aural Delay, is that this one would absolutely require we know the distance between the speakers. And then we would use that distance, as the basis for our time-delays… )

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