How the EPUB2 and MOBI formats can be used for typeset Math.

According to This preceding posting, I was experiencing some frustration over trying to typeset Math, for publication in EPUB2 format. EPUB3 format with MathML support was a viable alternative, though potentially hard on any readers I might have.

Well a situation exists in which either EPUB2 or MOBI can be used to publish typeset Math: Each lossless image can claim the entire width of a column of text, and each image can represent an entire equation. That way, the content of the document can alternate vertically between Text and Typeset Math.

In fact, if an author was to choose to do this, he or she could also use the Linux-based solutions ‘LyX’ , ‘ImageMagick’ , and ‘tex4ebook’ .

(Edited 1/9/2019, 15h35 … )

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Trying to bridge the gap to mobile-friendly reading of typeset equations, using EPUB3?

One of the sad facts about this blog is, that it’s not very mobile-friendly. The actual WordPress Theme that I use is very mobile-friendly, but I have the habit of inserting links into postings, that open typeset Math, in the form of PDF Files. And the real problem with those PDF Files is, the fact that when people try to view them on, say, smart-phones, the Letter-Sized page format forces them to pinch-zoom the document, and then to drag it around on their phone, not getting a good view of the overall document.

And so eventually I’m going to have to look for a better solution. One solution that works, is just to output a garbled PDF-File. But something better is in order.

A solution that works in principle, is to export my LaTeX -typeset Math to EPUB3-format, with MathML. But, the other EPUB and/or MOBI formats just don’t work. But the main downside after all that work for me is, the fact that although there are many ebook-readers for Android, there are only very few that can do everything which EPUB3 is supposed to be able to do, including MathML. Instead, the format is better-suited for distributing prose.

One ebook-reader that does support EPUB3 fully, is called “Infinity Reader“. But if I did publish my Math using EPUB3 format, then I’d be doing the uncomfortable deed, of practically requiring that my readers install this ebook-reader on their smart-phones, for which they’d next need to pay a small in-app purchase, just to get rid of the ads. I’d be betraying all those people who, like me, prefer open-source software. For many years, some version of ‘FBReader’ has remained sufficient for most users.

Thus, if readers get to read This Typeset Math, just because they installed that one ebook-reader, then the experience could end up becoming very disappointing for them. And, I don’t get any kick-back from ImeonSoft, for having encouraged this.

I suppose that this cloud has a silver lining. There does exist a Desktop-based / Laptop-based ebook-reader, which is capable of displaying all these EPUB3 ebooks, and which is as free as one could wish for: The Calibre Ebook Manager. When users install this either under Linux or under Windows, they will also be able to view the sample document I created and linked to above.

(Updated 1/6/2019, 6h00 … )

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What I’ve learned about RSA Encryption and Large Prime Numbers – How To Generate

One of the ways in which I function, is to write down thoughts in this blog, that may seem clear to me at first, but which, once written down, require further thought and refinement.

I’ve written numerous times about Public Key Cryptography, in which the task needs to be solved, to generate 1024-bit prime numbers – or maybe even, larger prime numbers – And I had not paid much attention to the question, of how exactly to do that efficiently. Well only yesterday, I read a posting of another blogger, that inspired me. This blogger explained in common-sense language, that a probabilistic method exists to verify whether a large number is prime, that method being called “The Miller-Rabin Test”. And the blogger in question was named Antoine Prudhomme.

This blogger left out an important part in his exercise, in which he suggested some working Python code, but that would be needed if actual production grade-code was to generate large prime numbers for practical cryptography. He left out the eventual need, to perform more than just one type of test, because this blogger’s main goal was to explain the one method of testing, that was his posting subject.

I decided to modify his code, and to add a simple Fermat Test, simply because (in general,) to have two different probabilistic tests, reduces the chances of false success-stories, even further than Miller-Rabin would reduce those chances by itself. But Mr. Prudhomme already mentioned that the Fermat Test exists, which is much simpler than the Miller-Rabin Test. And, I added the step of just using a Seive, with the known prime numbers up to 65535, which is known not to be prime itself. The combined effect of added tests, which my code performs prior to applying Miller-Rabin, will also speed the execution of code, because I am applying the fastest tests first, to reduce the total number of times that the slower test needs to be applied, in case the candidate-number could in fact be prime, as not having been eliminated by the earlier, simpler tests. Further, I tested my code thoroughly last night, to make sure I’ve uploaded code that works.

Here is my initial, academic code:

http://dirkmittler.homeip.net/text/Generate_Prime_3.py

 

(Corrected 10/03/2018, 23h20 … )

(Updated 10/08/2018, 9h25 … )

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About Encoding And Decoding Base-64 In FORTH

In This Previous Posting, I wrote that I had written some source-code in the language FORTH, that decodes standard Base-64 into a binary array of data, in output sizes that are multiples of 36 Bytes. For my own purposes, there might be no need to output Base-64, because I can use command-line utilities to prepare Base-64 strings, and then only use those as a means to enter the data, and embed it into future, hypothetical source code.

But the purposes of other, hypothetical software-developers have not been met with this exercise, because those people may need to be able to output Base-64, which means they’d need a matching encoder.

Unfortunately, the language does not lend itself to that easily, if a standard Base-64 radix is being implied, because 6-bit output-numerals would need to be bit-aligned, and trying to align fields of bits in FORTH is difficult.

(Edit 07/25/2017 : )

One subject which I have investigated more completely now, is the fact that the numeral-to-text conversion utilities built-in to FORTH, seem to continue to produce output, even if a Base of 64 has been set. In theory, the FORTH developers could have adopted a custom radix, in order to be able to state, that their binary-to-FB64 conversion is computed faster, than standard Base-64 could be. But OTOH, the characters output, could just become garbage, by the time 24-bit numerals are to be streamed:

 


dirk@Klystron:~$ gforth
Gforth 0.7.2, Copyright (C) 1995-2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
Gforth comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY; for details type `license'
Type `bye' to exit
: list-forth-b64 [ base @ decimal ] 64 base ! &255 &0 do i . space loop [ base ! ] ;  ok
list-forth-b64 0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  [  \  ]  ^  _  `  a  b  c  d  e  f  g  h  i  j  k  l  m  n  o  p  q  r  s  t  u  v  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  1A  1B  1C  1D  1E  1F  1G  1H  1I  1J  1K  1L  1M  1N  1O  1P  1Q  1R  1S  1T  1U  1V  1W  1X  1Y  1Z  1[  1\  1]  1^  1_  1`  1a  1b  1c  1d  1e  1f  1g  1h  1i  1j  1k  1l  1m  1n  1o  1p  1q  1r  1s  1t  1u  1v  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  2A  2B  2C  2D  2E  2F  2G  2H  2I  2J  2K  2L  2M  2N  2O  2P  2Q  2R  2S  2T  2U  2V  2W  2X  2Y  2Z  2[  2\  2]  2^  2_  2`  2a  2b  2c  2d  2e  2f  2g  2h  2i  2j  2k  2l  2m  2n  2o  2p  2q  2r  2s  2t  2u  2v  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  3A  3B  3C  3D  3E  3F  3G  3H  3I  3J  3K  3L  3M  3N  3O  3P  3Q  3R  3S  3T  3U  3V  3W  3X  3Y  3Z  3[  3\  3]  3^  3_  3`  3a  3b  3c  3d  3e  3f  3g  3h  3i  3j  3k  3l  3m  3n  3o  3p  3q  3r  3s  3t  3u  3v   ok
bye 
dirk@Klystron:~$ 


 

My conclusion is, that This pseudo- Base-64 streaming remains usable, even when 24-bit numerals are given.

This conclusion reverses a negative, tentative conclusion, which I had only given yesterday.

I have by now coded both the encoder and decoder for standard Base-64, which I’ve named ‘b64-stream’ and ‘b64-parse’ respectively, but as well the encoder and decoder for the pseudo- Base-64, which I call ‘fb64-stream’ and ‘fb64-parse’. At this point, Base-64 has been implemented in a way software-experts would consider complete, with a full non-standard version of Base-64. This is what the code ultimately does:

 


dirk@Klystron:~$ cd ~/Programs
dirk@Klystron:~/Programs$ gforth fb64-parse-6.fs
Gforth 0.7.2, Copyright (C) 1995-2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
Gforth comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY; for details type `license'
Type `bye' to exit
S" generate1234TERRIBLE.,?-" 4 / b64-stream b64-parse 0 4 * type generate1234TERRIBLE.,?- ok
S" generate1234TERRIBLE.,?-" 4 / fb64-stream fb64-parse 0 4 * type generate1234TERRIBLE.,?- ok
bye 
dirk@Klystron:~/Programs$ 


 

My custom-semantics assume that on the stack, a binary array exists, with a numeric value placed on top of it, which warns each encoder, how many 32-bit words each array holds. OTOH, the input to each decoder expects a standard, full string, which the corresponding encoder outputs, and which also exist as two items on the stack each time, where the top numeral states how many characters long the string is, as per standard FORTH.

And below is the source-code (Updated 08/02/2017 : )

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