Exploring the Discrete Sine Transform…

I can sometimes describe a way of using certain tools – such as in this case, one of the Discrete Cosine Transforms – which is correct in principle, but which has an underlying flaw, that needs to be corrected, from my first approximation of how it can be applied.

One of the things which I had said was possible was, to take a series of frequency-domain ‘equalizer settings’, which be at one per unit of frequency, not, at so many per octave, compute whichever DCT was relevant, such that the result had the lowest frequency as its first element, and then to apply that result as a convolution, in order finally to apply the computed equalizer to a signal.

One of the facts which I’m only realizing recently is, that if the DCT is computed in a one-sided way, the results are ‘completely non-ideal’, because it gives no control over what the phase-shifts will be, at any frequency! Similarly, such a one-sided convolution can also not be applied as the sinc function, because the amount of sine-wave output, in response to a cosine-wave input, will approach infinity, when the frequency is actually at the cutoff frequency.

What I have found instead is, that if such a cosine transform is mirrored around a centre-point, the amount of sine response, to an input cosine-wave, will cancel out and become zero, thus giving phase-shifts of zero.

But a result which some people might like is, to be able to apply controlled phase-shifts, differently for each frequency, such that those people specify a cosine as well as a sine component, for an assumed input cosine-wave.

The way to accomplish that is, to add-in the corresponding (normalized) sine-transform, of the series of phase-shifted response values, and to observe that the sine-transform will actually be zero at the centre-point. Then, the thing to do is, to apply the results negatively on the other side of the centre-point, which were to be applied positively on one side.


 

 

I have carried out a certain experiment with the Computer Algebra System named “wxMaxima”, in order first to observe what happens if a set of equal, discrete frequency-coefficients belonging to a series is summed. And then, I plotted the result of the definite integral, of the sine function, over a short interval. Just as with the sinc function, The integral of the cosine function was (sin(x) – sin(0)) / x, the definite integral of the sine function will be (1 – cos(x)) / x, and, Because the derivative of cos(x) is zero at (x = 0), the limit equation based on the divide by zero, will actually approach zero, and be well-behaved.


 

 

(Update 1/31/2021, 13h35: )

There is an underlying truth about Integral Equations in general, which people who studied Calculus 2 generally know, but, I have no right just to assume that any reader of my blog did so. There exist certain standard Integrals, which behave in the reverse way of how the standard Derivatives behave, just because ‘Integrals’ are ‘Antiderivatives’…

When one solves the Derivatives of certain trig functions repeatedly, one obtains the sequence:

sin(x) -> cos(x) -> -sin(x) -> -cos(x) -> sin(x)

Solving the Indefinite Integrals of the same trig functions yields the result:

sin(x) -> -cos(x) -> -sin(x) -> cos(x) -> sin(x)

Hence, the Indefinite Integral of sin(x) is in fact -cos(x), and:

( -(-cos(0)) = +1 )

(End of Update, 1/31/2021, 13h35.)

 

(Updated 2/04/2021, 17h10…)

Continue reading Exploring the Discrete Sine Transform…

How to compute the sine function, on a CPU with no FPU.

There exists a maxim in the publishing world, which is, ‘Publish or Perish.’ I guess it’s a good thing I’m not a publisher, then. In any case, it’s been a while since I posted anything, so I decided to share with the community some wisdom that existed in the early days of computing, and when I say that, it really means, ‘back in the early days’. This is something that might have been used on mini-computers, or, on the computers in certain special applications, before PCs as such existed.

A standard capability which should exist, is to compute a decently accurate sine function. And one of the most lame reasons could be, the fact that audio files have been encoded with an amplitude, but that a decoder, or speech synthesis chip, might only need to be able to play back a sine-wave, that has that encoded peak amplitude. However, it’s not always a given that any ‘CPU’ (“Central Processing Unit”) actually possesses an ‘FPU’ (a “Floating-Point Unit”). In such situations, programmers back-when devised a trick.

It’s already known, that a table of pre-computed sine functions could be made part of a program, numbering maybe 256, but that, if all a program did was, to look up sine values from such a table once, ridiculously poor accuracies would initially result. But it was also known that, as long as the interval of 1 sine-wave was from (zero) to (two-times-pi), the derivative of the sine function was the cosine function. So, the trick, really, was, to make not one lookup into the table, but at least two, one to fetch an approximate sine value, and the next, to fetch an approximate cosine value, the latter of which was supposedly the derivative of the sine value at the same point. What could be done was, that a fractional part of the parameter, between table entries, could be multiplied by this derivative, and the result also added to the sine value, thus yielding a closer approximation to the real sine value. (:3)

But, a question which readers might have about this next could be, ‘Why does Dirk not just look up two adjacent sine-values, subtract to get the delta, and then, multiply the fractional part by this delta?’ And the answer is, ‘Because one can not only apply the first derivative, but also the second derivative, by squaring the fractional part and halving it (:1), before multiplying the result from that, by the negative of the sine function!’ One obtains a section of a parabola, and results from a 256-element table, that are close to 16 bits accurate!

The source code can be found in my binaries folder, which is:

https://dirkmittler.homeip.net/binaries/

And, in that folder, the compressed files of interest would be, ‘IntSine.tar.gz’ and ‘IntSine.zip’. They are written in C. The variance that I get, from established values, in (16-bit) integer units squared, is “0.811416” “0.580644” (:2). Any variance lower than (1.0) should be considered ‘good’, since (±1) is actually the smallest-possible, per-result error.


(Updated 12/04/2020, 11h50… )

Continue reading How to compute the sine function, on a CPU with no FPU.