What the difference is, between a Native and a Scanned PDF File.

As the subject line suggests, this posting will just define the subject of Native versus Scanned PDF Files.

I have encountered people who simply regard PDF Files as a convenient way to scan a stack of images – from paper – and to store those images. The resulting Scanned PDF Files do have advantages over certain other image formats, such that:

  • They can be password-protected, locked, ‘DRM’ed, etc.,
  • They keep track of a document consisting of more than one actual image, aka page.

But their main disadvantage is, that because they were scanned, they are also rasterized, which means that they have a fixed resolution in pixels. (‘Rasterized’ images are also referred to as ‘Pixel-Maps’ or ‘Bit-Maps’.) I supppose that if a paper document is being scanned, this is not a big deal, because the original document had a limit in its physical level of detail. (:1) But as an alternative, Native PDF Files also exist.

In order to understand what those are, the reader needs to be aware that a form of graphics exists in general, which is an alternative to pixel-based graphics, and that is called ‘Vector-Based Graphics’. What this form of graphics entails is, that there exists a Mathematical definition of a curve, which is often also referred to as a ‘Path’, the parameters of which can be changed from one path to the next. Those parameters need to state in floating-point numbers, where the endpoints of the path are, and, preferably, define what the derivative of the curve is at both endpoints. The most standard type of Mathematical function that does this is a Cubic Spline, but that is by no means the only function available.

A vector-based image consists of a collection of paths, each of which has a different set of these numerical parameters, even in cases where the function is always the same. Also, there often needs to be a stored detail, of how to render such paths, such as to fill in the area inside a closed path with a fill colour, etc..

Continue reading What the difference is, between a Native and a Scanned PDF File.

Musing about Deferred Shading.

One of the subjects which fascinate me is, Computer-Generated Images, CGI, specifically, that render a 3D scene to a 2D perspective. But that subject is still rather vast. One could narrow it by first suggesting an interest in the hardware-accelerated form of CGI, which is also referred to as “Raster-Based Graphics”, and which works differently from ‘Ray-Tracing’. And after that, a further specialization can be made, into a modern form of it, known a “Deferred Shading”.

What happens with Deferred Shading is, that an entire scene is Rendered To Texture, but in such a way that, in addition to surface colours, separate output images also hold normal-vectors, and a distance-value (a depth-value), for each fragment of this initial rendering. And then, the resulting ‘G-Buffer’ can be put through post-processing, which results in the final 2D image. What advantages can this bring?

  • It allows for a virtually unlimited number of dynamic lights,
  • It allows for ‘SSAO’ – “Screen Space Ambient Occlusion” – to be implemented,
  • It allows for more-efficient reflections to be implemented, in the form of ‘SSR’s – “Screen-Space Reflections”.
  • (There could be more benefits.)

One fact which people should be aware of, given traditional strategies for computing lighting, is, that by default, the fragment shader would need to perform a separate computation for each light source that strikes the surface of a model. An exception to this has been possible with some game engines in the past, where a virtually unlimited number of static lights can be incorporated into a level map, by being baked in, as additional shadow-maps. But when it comes to computing dynamic lights – lights that can move and change intensity during a 3D game – there have traditionally been limits to how many of those may illuminate a given surface simultaneously. This was defined by how complex a fragment shader could be made, procedurally.

(Updated 1/15/2020, 14h45 … )

Continue reading Musing about Deferred Shading.

A fact about how software-rendering is managed in practice, today.

People of my generation – and I’m over 50 years old as I’m writing this – first learned about CGI – computer-simulated images – in the form of ‘ray-tracing’. What my contemporaries are slow to find out is that meanwhile, an important additional form of CGI has come into existence, which is referred to as ‘raster-based rendering’.

Ray-tracing has as advantage over raster-based rendering, better optical accuracy, which leads to photo-realism. Ray-tracing therefore still gets used a lot, especially in Hollywood-originated CGI for Movies, etc.. But ray-tracing still has a big drawback, which is, that it’s slow to compute. Typically, ray-tracing cannot be done in real-time, needs to be performed on a farm of computers, and typically, an hour of CPU-time may be needed, to render a sequence which might play for 10 seconds.

But, in order for consumers to be able to play 3D games, the CGI needs to be in real-time, for which reason the other type of rendering was invented in the 1990s, and this form of rendering is carried out by the graphics hardware, in real-time.

What this dichotomy has led to, is model- and scene-editors such as “Blender”, which allow complex editing of 3D content, often with the purpose that the content eventually be rendered by arbitrary, external methods, that include software-based, ray tracing. But such editing applications still themselves possess an Editing Preview window / rectangle, in which their power-users can see the technical details of what they’re editing, in real-time. And those editing preview windows are then hardware-rendered, using raster-based methods, instead of the final result being rendered using raster-based methods.

Continue reading A fact about how software-rendering is managed in practice, today.

Understanding that The GPU Is Real

A type of graphics hardware which once existed, was an arrangement by which a region of memory was formatted to correspond directly to screen-pixels, and by which a primitive set of chips would rasterize that memory-region, sending the analog-equivalent of pixel-values to an output-device, such as a monitor, even while the CPU was writing changes to the same memory-region. This type of graphics arrangement is currently referred to as “A Framebuffer Device”. Since the late 1990s, these types of graphics have been replaced by graphics, that possess a ‘GPU’ – a Graphics Processing Unit. The acronym GPU follows similarly to how the acronym ‘CPU’ is formed, the latter of which stands for Central Processing Unit.

A GPU is essentially a kind of co-processor, which does a lot of the graphics-work that the CPU once needed to do, back in the days of framebuffer-devices. The GPU has been optimized, where present, to give real-time 2D, perspective-renderings of 3D scenes, that are fed to the GPU in a language that is either some version of DirectX, or in some version of OpenGL. But, modern GPUs are also capable of performing certain 2D tasks, such as to accelerate the playback of compressed video-streams at very high resolutions, and to do Desktop Compositing.

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What they do is called raster-based rendering, as opposed to ray-tracing, where ray-tracing cannot usually be accomplished in real-time.

And modern smart-phones and tablets, also typically have GPUs, that give them some of their smooth home-screen effects and animations, which would all be prohibitive to program under software-based graphics.

The fact that some phone or computer has been designed and built by Apple, does not mean that it has no GPU. Apple presently uses OpenGL as its main language to communicate 3D to its GPUs.

DirectX is totally owned by Microsoft.

The GPU of a general-purpose computing device often possesses additional protocols for accepting data from the CPU, other than DirectX or OpenGL. The accelerated, 2D decompressed video-streams would be an example of that, which are possible under Linux, if a graphics-driver supports ‘vdpau‘ …

Dirk