Trying to bridge the gap to mobile-friendly reading of typeset equations, using EPUB3?

One of the sad facts about this blog is, that it’s not very mobile-friendly. The actual WordPress Theme that I use is very mobile-friendly, but I have the habit of inserting links into postings, that open typeset Math, in the form of PDF Files. And the real problem with those PDF Files is, the fact that when people try to view them on, say, smart-phones, the Letter-Sized page format forces them to pinch-zoom the document, and then to drag it around on their phone, not getting a good view of the overall document.

And so eventually I’m going to have to look for a better solution. One solution that works, is just to output a garbled PDF-File. But something better is in order.

A solution that works in principle, is to export my LaTeX -typeset Math to EPUB3-format, with MathML. But, the other EPUB and/or MOBI formats just don’t work. But the main downside after all that work for me is, the fact that although there are many ebook-readers for Android, there are only very few that can do everything which EPUB3 is supposed to be able to do, including MathML. Instead, the format is better-suited for distributing prose.

One ebook-reader that does support EPUB3 fully, is called “Infinity Reader“. But if I did publish my Math using EPUB3 format, then I’d be doing the uncomfortable deed, of practically requiring that my readers install this ebook-reader on their smart-phones, for which they’d next need to pay a small in-app purchase, just to get rid of the ads. I’d be betraying all those people who, like me, prefer open-source software. For many years, some version of ‘FBReader’ has remained sufficient for most users.

Thus, if readers get to read This Typeset Math, just because they installed that one ebook-reader, then the experience could end up becoming very disappointing for them. And, I don’t get any kick-back from ImeonSoft, for having encouraged this.

I suppose that this cloud has a silver lining. There does exist a Desktop-based / Laptop-based ebook-reader, which is capable of displaying all these EPUB3 ebooks, and which is as free as one could wish for: The Calibre Ebook Manager. When users install this either under Linux or under Windows, they will also be able to view the sample document I created and linked to above.

(Updated 1/6/2019, 6h00 … )

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How NOT to control our Gaming Keyboards, from a Linux computer.

One of the commodities which serious computer enthusiasts might want to buy, is a gaming keyboard. One reason may be the fact that by coincidence, gaming keyboards tend to be sound mechanical keyboards as well, which have per-key switches, which in turn have the desired tactile response, which bubble-keyboards today often lack.

But then, one of the features which gaming keyboards may add, is the ability to store and play back macros when in gaming-mode, those macros being key-sequences which a player needs to enter repeatedly, but tires of typing each time.

Another feature gaming keyboards can have, is fancy LED back-lights, which can even be customized to highlight different groups of keys, depending on how those groups of keys are important to certain uses of the KB. ( :1 )

I just bought the “ThermalTake eSports Poseidon Z RGB”, with Blue Key-Switches. The blue key-switches are switches that not only give good tactile feedback, but also make a distinct, high-pitched clicking sound, at exactly the right instant, during a key-press.

They have mechanical hysteresis.

One less-optimistic side-effect for this, under Linux, is the fact that some of the customization of this KB requires that proprietary software be used, of which there only exists the Windows version. The main functioning of the KB will work under Linux (Debian / Stretch), but if we want to program the layout-coloring / highlighting, then we need to use the proprietary software. These layouts can then be stored in 1 out of 5 Profiles, on the KB itself, which has its own 32-bit embedded micro-controller (i.e., this KB has its own CPU).

I tried to find out, whether I could install the software under a specific Wine folder, and then create symlinks to various device-files that exist natively under Linux, so that those device-files will appear as generic, DOS-type serial ports. Since Wine, by default, does not have direct access to the host machine’s USB-connected hardware.

The result was, that I bricked the keyboard. I needed some support from the retailer who sold me the keyboard, to recover a fully-functional instance.

The sum total of what this means, is that I can use this KB under Linux. I must just store its customizations using an old Windows laptop I have – a dual-boot ‘Acer Aspire 5020′ – after which I can disconnect the KB from that laptop, and connect it to my main (Linux) desktop again.

(Edit 04/05/2018 : )

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(One problem with trying to photograph this keyboard with a simple phone-cam is, the fact that the LEDs produce light with high intensity. This light tends to saturate the light-sensor in a conventional camera-phone, which in turn results in a reduction, to the recorded color saturation. I.e., when the BG light-level is normalized by a camera-phone, the brightest primary colors are off-the-scale, but limited to scale as encoded.

Therefore, Blues will seem to look similar to Greens, and Yellows look similar to Whites.

When seen with the naked eye, all these colors look very deep. )

 

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