Installing a “Wacom” graphics / digitizer tablet under Linux.

I’ve just received my “Wacom Intuos PT S 2″ digitizer tablet – aka graphics tablet – which I had specifically bought, because there is some support for the Wacom series of tablets under Linux. I was able to get it working 100%, and also did get the ‘wireless kit’ to work, that I had ordered with it.

Under Linux, we need to have at least these two packages installed, in order to get this hardware to work:

  • ‘xserver-xorg-input-wacom’
  • ‘libwacom2′

If available, the following should also be installed:

  • ‘libwacom-bin’

Additionally I should mention that I did this on the Debian / Stretch computer I name ‘Plato’, on which I have Plasma 5 as my desktop manager. Although Debian and Linux do support Wacom, apparently, Plasma 5 as such does not. This effectively means that individual applications may have tablet-support, but that We’re not given a graphical module for the System Settings panel, from which to customize our tablet. For that reason, I needed to write a shell-script which does this for me:

 

#!/bin/bash

xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 Finger touch" Touch off
xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 Pen stylus" Button 2 key "shift"
xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 Pen stylus" Button 3 key "ctrl"

xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 Pad pad" Button 1 key "button +3"
xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 Pad pad" Button 3 key "del"


xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 Pad pad" Button 8 key "ctrl" "c"
xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 Pad pad" Button 9 key "ctrl" "v"

xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 (WL) Finger touch" Touch off
xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 (WL) Pen stylus" Button 2 key "shift"
xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 (WL) Pen stylus" Button 3 key "ctrl"

xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 (WL) Pad pad" Button 1 key "button +3"
xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 (WL) Pad pad" Button 3 key "del"


xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 (WL) Pad pad" Button 8 key "ctrl" "c"
xsetwacom --set "Wacom Intuos PT S 2 (WL) Pad pad" Button 9 key "ctrl" "v"

 

Presumably, any other users with Plasma 5 desktop-managers will need to write similar scripts. Simply typing in the command ‘xsetwacom’ without any arguments, will display its basic usage.

It should also be noted, that after an X-server module has been installed, that will act as the input driver, at the very least, the X-server also needs to be restarted, before that driver will be loaded.

(Updated 03/24/2018 : )

Continue reading Installing a “Wacom” graphics / digitizer tablet under Linux.

KdeWallet, and Using Smb4K, under Plasma 5

One fact which I’ve written about before, is that I have an up-to-date Linux computer, that uses the ‘Plasma 5′ desktop manager, which is actually the successor to ‘KDE 4′. When using this desktop manager, we can still install numerous packages that ‘belong’ to the old, KDE 4, and most of them will continue to work. One of those is ‘smb4k’, which is a point-and-click utility, to mount a network SMB share – aka, a Windows-file-share, such that it will be visible in our home folder, as though that share was a local sub-folder.

There exist command-line methods to do the same thing, which would mount that network share, and declare it’s of the ‘cifs’ file-system-type, but the use of a simple GUI to do so may be easier.

But then one problem which ensues, is that Smb4K will use the KDE 4 Wallet, to store our password, for that share. It will function in this way, by depending on the package ‘kde-runtime’. In truth, this latter package probably pulls in numerous (old) KDE 4 libraries, and not just the old KWallet, but the existence of this KDE 4 Wallet, on our Plasma 5 machine, is most obvious…

Continue reading KdeWallet, and Using Smb4K, under Plasma 5

Getting the Orca Screen-Reader to work under Plasma 5

In case some readers might not know, even though computing is heavily visual, certain advanced desktop-managers can be set up for impaired people to use – which also falls under the category of “Accessibility”. This includes the ability of the computer to speak a robotic description of what’s happening on the screen, in case a user can hear, but not see properly.

There are some users who feel they should stick with Windows, because Accessibility can be so hard to set up under Linux.

There are other users who are sorry they every clicked on “Accessibility”, because now they cannot turn it off.

If a visually-impaired user wants Accessibility set up on a Linux computer, I’d definitely suggest letting a trusted other person set it up, because until it’s set up, complicated things may need to be done, and accessibility will not be set up, so that the end-user will not benefit from Accessibility, while trying to set it up.

Some regular users find screen-readers trying for their patience, because of the fast, robotic voice, until they manage to shut it down again. Personally, I only find screen-readers trying, If I happen to have set one up late at night, because the voice could cause some sort of noise-complaint from my neighbors, droning on until I manage to disable it again. In the middle of the day, I don’t find these experiments trying.

I guess that a good question which some people might ask me, would be why I even do such an experiment, given that I’m not visually impaired and don’t need it. And what I do is set everything up until it works, and then disable it again.

On my recently-installed Debian / Stretch computer named ‘Plato’, which is also running Plasma 5 as its desktop-manager, I just did manage to get this feature to work, and then to disable it again.

(Updated 15h50, 1/17/2018 : )

The first thing I had to do, was install a long list of packages. The list below includes what was installed, but it should not really be necessary to give the command to the package-manager manually, to install everything here, because some of these packages will follow as dependencies from other packages. But here is a roundabout list:

Continue reading Getting the Orca Screen-Reader to work under Plasma 5

Simultaneous Update on Debian / Stretch Seems To Fix Wayland Bug, But An Effect Breaks.

This morning was one, on which most of my computers are receiving major system updates.

On the computer that acts as my Web-server, which I name ‘Phoenix’, this updated my Debian / Jessie version from 8.9 to 8.10.

On the computer which I most-recently installed, which I name ‘Plato’, this updated my Debian / Stretch version from 9.2 to 9.3 .

On both computers, this included a kernel-update. Additionally, it included an update, to the client-side X-server libraries. This posting has to do with the computer named ‘Plato’, which has kernel version ‘4.9.0-4-amd64′ now.

Previously I had blogged, that the computer named ‘Plato’ was suffering from a mysterious bug in its ‘Wayland’ compositor. If the compositing became suspended for any reason, after resuming, black rectangles would appear on the screen, as newly-opened windows faded in and out. This used to happen regardless of whether OpenGL 2 or OpenGL 3 compositing was being used.

Well since the update today, I tested the key-combination <Shift>+<Alt>+F12 again, which does the equivalent of sending the command to the compositor, to suspend. Apparently, the behavior of this key-combination has been changed since Debian / Jessie, so that instead of toggling, the compositing suspends for several seconds, and then automatically resumes. This would be useless as a user-feature, but can help with testing, because presumably, what an OpenGL application is supposed to do, is resend the signal every second or so, to make sure that compositing stays off.

To my pleasant surprise, I found that after compositing resumes, I no longer get black rectangles on the screen! :-)

Continue reading Simultaneous Update on Debian / Stretch Seems To Fix Wayland Bug, But An Effect Breaks.