Samsung’s Auto Hot-Spot Feature

I own a Samsung Galaxy S9 smart-phone, and have discovered that, in its tethering settings, there is a new setting, which is named “Auto Hotspot”. What this setting aims to do if activated is, on other Samsung devices, which normally only have WiFi, when the user is roaming along with his phone, there should appear an additional access point for them to connect to. The following screen-shots show, where this can be enabled on the phone

Screenshot_20201220-072343_Settings_e

Screenshot_20201220-072354_Settings_e

Screenshot_20201220-072404_Settings_e

Screenshot_20201220-072414_Settings_e

I believe that this explains a fact which I’ve already commented on elsewhere, which is, that when I try to set up Google Instant Tethering, the negotiation between my ‘Asus Flip C213 Chromebook’ and this phone, no longer adds Instant Tethering to the list of features which are enabled. My Samsung S9 phone will now only unlock the Chromebook. What I am guessing is that, because the feature I’m showing in this posting is a Samsung feature, with which Samsung wants to compete with the other companies, Samsung probably removed to offer Instant Tethering from their phone.

Obviously, this is only a feature which I will now be able to use, between my S9 phone, and my Samsung Galaxy TAB S6 tablet.


 

 

The reader may ask what the advantages of this feature might be, over ‘regular WiFi tethering’, or ‘a WiFi hotspot’. The advantage could be, that even though it remains an option compatible with all clients, to have the phone constantly offer a WiFi hot-spot could drain the battery more. Supposedly, if Samsung’s Auto Hotspot is being used, it can be kept enabled on the phone, yet not drain the battery overly, as long as client devices do not connect. The decision could then be made directly from the client device, whether to connect or not… This is similar, to what Google’s system offers.

Also, the Samsung phones with Android 10 have as feature, that their ‘regular hotspots’ will time out, say after 20 minutes of inactivity, again, to save battery drain. Yet, if the user is carrying a tablet with him that has been configured to connect to the mobile hotspot Automatically, the phone which is serving out this hotspot will never detect inactivity.


 

Further, I’ve been able to confirm that, as long as I have Auto Hotspot turned on on my phone, indeed it does not show up as an available WiFi connection, on devices that are not joined to my Samsung account. This is as expected. But it also adds hope that, as long as I don’t connect to the phone’s Auto Hotspot from another device, the battery drain due to my leaving this feature enabled on my phone constantly, may not be very high. I will comment by the end of this day, after having left my phone with its own WiFi Off, which means that my phone will be using its Mobile Data, but, not connecting my Samsung TAB S6, whether doing this seems to incur any unusually high amount of battery drain, on the phone…

 

Continue reading Samsung’s Auto Hot-Spot Feature

Another possible reason, why my Google Pixel C might have started crashing.

One of the facts which I posted about recently was, that My Google Pixel C Tablet had started crashing, roughly every one or two months. Because I haven’t really installed any new software on it, and because the most recent System Update took place sometime in mid-2019, I had assumed that the recent malfunctions could be due to some sort of hardware problem.

The fact that this tablet, which I only bought in 2017, was starting to become unstable, was partially also, why I have recently acquired a Samsung Galaxy Tab S6 tablet, as an eventual replacement.

But, there is in fact another possible explanation, for the crashes of the Pixel C. Until 2019, that tablet had received System Updates roughly once every month. It might just be that, due to many memory leaks, that tablet really needs to be rebooted once per month, and if nothing else, System Updates also resulted in soft reboots. The failure to perform any soft reboots, may be what’s leading to hard reboots. Only, hard reboots are dangerous, because too many of them can lead to file system corruption.

In that regard, I’m hoping that the new Tab S6, which has Android 10 installed, will offer a possible preventive measure, in the fact that it can be scheduled in advance, to reboot automatically, let’s say once per week. If that feature works out as expected, then the tablet in question may indeed last longer than the Pixel C did.

Really, I think it strange, that an Android tablet would crash – or hard-boot – because it was not soft-booted for more than a month. After all, my phones, also being Android devices, have usually been able to run for more than 2 months, without requiring any reboots, and when those finally do receive a soft-boot, it’s part of their System Update.

Dirk

 

My Google Pixel C tablet is nearing the end of its life.

One of the facts which I did blog about was that, around April of 2017, I had purchased a Google Pixel C Tablet, which, in the meantime, had an O/S Upgrade to Android 8.1.0. That tablet is nearing the end of its life, and it’s barely 3 years old.

Firstly, it has not been receiving any system upgrades since 2019.

Secondly, as of a few months ago, it has started the behaviour of ‘spontaneously rebooting’ every few weeks, even though all I’ve been doing with it was, to keep it idling.

Some people tend to dismiss this behaviour of certain Android devices, just spontaneously to reboot, as if it was insignificant. But to the contrary, I tend to look at this as a crash each time, just as if a PC running Windows had suddenly received a Blue Screen. It can be caused by several things, but in this case I’m afraid, it might be a hardware problem, especially, since I have not been installing much software on it, nor receiving System Upgrades, at least, in the recent months.

Therefore, I am looking for a replacement, Android, Tablet.

BTW, The dedicated keyboard that came with this tablet has continued to work, to this day. I guess that I was lucky, not to receive a keyboard with a degraded built-in battery.

Dirk

 

My Pixel C Tablet Ran Out Of Power Last Night.

I own a Google Pixel C tablet, that runs Android 8.1.0 . As is customary for me, I leave it In Standby each night, which means that it’s still drawing some small amount of current from its battery.

Usually, I’d inspect the tablet before going to bed each night, to verify that it will still have enough juice in its battery, to sleep through the night. But somehow, last night, I just failed to verify this, and assumed that the tablet was okay to sleep through the night.

Also, I slept-in this morning. Well as I was sleeping in, the tablet made a few notification sounds which I’d never heard from it before, and the fact that it was doing so did not alarm me in my sleep.

So this morning, when I tried to reboot the tablet, it would proceed partially into the boot process, and then just play its notification sound, and shut off again. So what I needed to do was leave it plugged in for two hours, and then try rebooting it again. Which worked!

But there was just a possible scenario in my mind, of what could have gone wrong last night, and what could potentially have bricked the tablet.

Continue reading My Pixel C Tablet Ran Out Of Power Last Night.