Some Bugs of my LXDE-based Computer, ‘Klexel’

I wrote only yesterday, that I had set up a computer with the Linux desktop-manager ‘LXDE’, and that I had named that computer ‘Klexel’.

Well I’m finding out that this computer has a bug. If I leave it with its screen-locker locked for some time, and then unlock with my password, the unlock dialog seems to succeed, but only reveals a black desktop, with only the mouse-pointer visible.

I suspect that I know what causes this. The computer in question has an old ‘Intel 910′ graphics chip-set, and although it may be good the the chip-set is supported, that chip-set and its drivers have quirks. I do have OpenGL 1.4, which should be high enough a version. But it may be that ‘behind the screen-locker’, by the time I’ve unlocked the machine again, the ‘Compiz Fusion’ desktop compositor has crashed.

There are certain other quirks which point to a graphics chip problem:

  • The window title-bars sometimes don’t render, until I click in the region where the title-bar should be, in which case they reappear.
  • Wobbly Windows needs to be enabled, in order for me to be able to restore the title-bars in this simple way.

I found that a practical way to deal with this not-resuming from the screen-locker, may be, by setting the key-sequence <Ctrl>+<Alt>+<Backspace> just to kill the X-server, as it would do under KDE or Plasma 5, using the following customization. I can right-click on the Keyboard Layout Tray Icon, then left-click on “Keyboard Layout Handler Settings”, and then:

screenshot-from-2018-09-02-06-21-12_c

I have set 2 ‘setxkbmap Options':

  1. The Compose Key,
  2. The X-server kill key.

Killing the X- just prompts me for a log-in again.

Note:

There is some possibility that the Compiz crash, on resuming from a plain lock-screen, may have to do with the Compiz setting, to display a Splash Image. By default, Kanotix systems come with an animated Kanotix splash-screen, that may look nice on systems with stable graphics, and for the first few times the system is explored. We can change this splash-screen to something other than the Kanotix splash-screen.

But I have noticed that, just for Compiz to start the splash-screen, causes instability with the Intel 910 chip-set, even if it does work. So what may be happening, is that on resuming from the lock-screen, Compiz may be programmed to display the splash-screen, and doing so may be what crashes my session. And so for now, I’ve also disabled this feature, and will comment later, on whether having done so has fixed the crashes.

(Update 09/05/2018, 15h30 … )

(As of 09/02/2018 : )

Continue reading Some Bugs of my LXDE-based Computer, ‘Klexel’

Debian Category Missing From Plasma Menu.

I use several Linux-based computers, which include an older machine running Debian / Jessie and the KDE 4 desktop manager, and a more-recently-installed machine, running Debian / Stretch and the Plasma 5.8 desktop manager.

Under KDE 4 – which I’ve grown used to over the years – the K-Menu – aka, the Application Launcher – would display a nested menu-system, that included the KDE categories into which applications should fit, which are defined essentially by ‘.desktop’ files, plus a separate category called ‘Debian’, which was denoted by a folder-icon, and which was nested several levels deep, into which almost every installed application should be sortable, defined essentially by the contents of the directory ‘/usr/share/menu’.

k-menu_1s

Under my Plasma 5.8 setup, one fact which I was missing, was the earlier presence of this Debian -category:

k-menu_2s

 

Instead, this computer has a larger abundance of entries, in its Lost+Found category (not shown), which is really just another way of saying, ‘entries which it cannot otherwise put into categories’. In fact, many of the entries that now occur under Lost+Found, also occur under listed categories.

(Updated 12/14/2017 : )

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Alpha-Blending

The concept seems rather intuitive, by which a single object or entity can be translucent. But another concept which is less intuitive, is that the degree to which it is so can be stated once per pixel, through an alpha-channel.

Just as every pixel can possess one channel for each of the three additive primary colors: Red, Green and Blue, It can possess a 4th channel named Alpha, which states on a scale from [ 0.0 … 1.0 ] , how opaque it is.

This does not just apply to the texture images, whose pixels are named texels, but also to Fragment Shader output, as well as to the pixels actually associated with the drawing surface, which provide what is known as destination alpha, since the drawing surface is also the destination of the rendering, or its target.

Hence, there exist images whose pixels have a 4channel format, as opposed to others, with a mere 3-channel format.

Now, there is no clear way for a display to display alpha. In certain cases, alpha in an image being viewed is hinted by software, as a checkerboard pattern. But what we see is nevertheless color-information and not transparency. And so a logical question can be, what the function of this alpha-channel is, which is being rendered to.

There are many ways in which the content from numerous sources can be blended, but most of the high-quality ones require, that much communication takes place between rendering-stages. A strategy is desired in which output from rendering-passes is combined, without requiring much communication between the passes. And alpha-blending is a de-facto strategy for that.

By default, closer entities, according to the position of their origins in view space, are rendered first. What this does is put closer values into the Z-buffer as soon as possible, so that the Z-buffer can prevent the rendering of the more distant entities as efficiently as possible. 3D rendering starts when the CPU gives the command to ‘draw’ one entity, which has an arbitrary position in 3D. This may be contrary to what 2D graphics might teach us to predict.

Alas, alpha-entities – aka entities that possess alpha textures – do not write the Z-buffer, because if they did, they would prevent more-distant entities from being rendered. And then, there would be no point in the closer ones being translucent.

The default way in which alpha-blending works, is that the alpha-channel of the display records the extent to which entities have been left visible, by previous entities which have been rendered closer to the virtual camera.

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