There are some bugs, in how the proprietary nVidia graphics drivers implement OpenCL.

In this earlier posting, I described how I had replaced the open-source ‘Nouveau’ drivers for my ‘nVidia’ graphics card, with nVidia’s proprietary drivers. And one of my goals was, to enable ‘OpenCL’ as well as ‘CUDA’ capabilities, which are both vehicles towards ‘GPU-computing’.

In order to test my new setup, I had subscribed to some ‘BOINC Projects‘, some of which in turn used OpenCL to power GPU Work Units.

The way in which I was setting up my computer ‘Plato’, on which all of this was to happen, was that I’d be able to use that computer, among other things, in order to run OpenGL applications and play 3D games during the day, but that at night–time hours, when I was at bed, the computer would fetch BOINC Work Units and run them – partially, on my GPU.

(Updated 05/04/2018, 13h50 … )

Continue reading There are some bugs, in how the proprietary nVidia graphics drivers implement OpenCL.

Finding Out, How Many GPU Cores we have, Under Linux

One question which I see written about often on the Web, is how to find out certain stats about our GPU, under Linux. Under Windows, we had GUI-based programs such as ‘GPU-Z’, etc., but under Linux, the information can be just a bit harder to find.

I think that one tool which helps, is to have ‘OpenCL’ installed, as well as the command-line utility ‘clinfo’, which exists as one out of several packages, and as an actual, resulting command-name.

If we’re serious about programming our GPU, then having a GUI won’t help us much. We’d need to get dirty with code in that case, and then to have text-based solutions is suitable. But, if we’re just spectators in this sport, then two stats we may nevertheless want to know are:

  1. How many GPU-Core-Groups do we have – since GPU-Cores are organized as Groups, and
  2. How many actual Shader-Cores do we have in each Group?

Interestingly, the grouping of shader-cores, also represents how many vector-processors such GPU-computing tools as OpenCL see. And so, on the computer which I name ‘Klystron’, which is running Debian / Jessie, when typing in these commands as user, I get the following results:

 


dirk@Klystron:~$ clinfo | grep units
  Max compute units:                             4
  Max compute units:                             6
dirk@Klystron:~$ clinfo | grep multiple
  Kernel Preferred work group size multiple:     1
  Kernel Preferred work group size multiple:     64
dirk@Klystron:~$

 

This needs some explaining. On ‘Klystron’, I have the proprietary, AMD packages for OpenCL installed, since that computer has both an AMD CPU and a Radeon GPU. And this means that the OpenCL version will be able to carry out computing on both. And so I have the stats for both.

In this case, the second entries reveal that I have 6×64 cores on the GPU.

Continue reading Finding Out, How Many GPU Cores we have, Under Linux