Just performed a wanton reboot of my Modem/Router.

The modem/router which I use for my LAN is a Bell Hub 3000, which I still hold to be a good modem. But lately, I discovered a slight glitch in the way it works. I have given it numerous specialized settings, such as, for example, a “Reserved IP Address” for my new Chromebook.

The problem I ran in to was, that the modem was executing all my settings without the slightest flaw, but was failing to commit changes to certain settings to non-volatile memory. Apparently, the way the modem is organized internally is, that it has volatile as well as non-volatile memory, which mimic the RAM and the Storage of other, modern devices.

In certain cases, even a full-blown PC could be running some version of an operating system, in which a user-initiated change is accepted and enacted, but only saved to non-volatile storage, when the user logs out successfully.

Well, earlier this evening I had a power failure, after which the modem restarted, but restarted with settings, that predated the most recent settings which I had given it. This was its only offence.

Now, I could go through the ritual of changing all my special settings again, after every power failure, but in reality, that would not do. And so, what I did was to soft-boot the modem, which, just like that poorly programmed desktop manager would, saved all my settings to non-volatile memory. After the reboot, those settings have stuck.

But what it also means is twofold:

  1. This blog went down again, from 20h15 until 20h25, in other words, for an extra 10 minutes.
  2. And, if there are any readers who examine the IP address log in the side-bar of my blog, they will notice an additional IP address change, simply due to the modem reboot. This will be, between 20h10 and 21h10. This one was not due to any malfunction, but was deliberately triggered by my action.

The process was short but painful, and had to be done. :-)

Dirk