Technical Impediment In Getting Sound From My Linux Tablet (Solved)

One of the facts which I’ve blogged about is, that I have a Linux Guest System installed on the Android Tablet, that’s a Google Pixel C.

Another fact which I blogged about a long time ago was, that I am able to share the PulseAudio Sound Server that resides on the computer now named ‘Phosphene’, for use by the client computer I name ‘Klexel’.

A basic limitation to my Linux Tablet remains, that it isn’t suited to play back audio streams, or video streams that have audio, because inherently, I’m just running its Linux Guest as a VNC Session. And so a logical thought on that would be:

‘Why not specify the Sound-Providing Server, as the place that the Linux Guest System streams its sound to, at least as long as I am on my own LAN?’

And while in theory this sounds like a good idea, in practice the implementation is still some distance away.

The main problem? While ‘Klexel’ is connected to this Sound Server, it ties up the only TCP Port, which is therefore unable to accept new connections, say from my Linux Tablet. Now, I can tell ‘Klexel’ to relinquish its session on the Sound Server, but doing so has an unexpected consequence. This corrupts the module on the PulseAudio Server, that was listening for remote connections. I need to unload the module, and reload it with the same parameters as before, just so that ‘Klexel’ can reconnect.

The long-term effect of this will be, that the Linux Tablet may be able to obtain one session on ‘Phosphene’ for sound, but that every time this tablet disconnects, again, that module on Phosphene’s PulseAudio Server will go into a corrupted state.

Hence, I have not yet worked this into a practical solution. But if I ever did, I’d be able to expand the applications of the Linux Guest System – on the Tablet – into audiovisual applications.


 

Update:

I am now one step closer to permitting Linux audiovisual applications on my tablet to access the sound server on my LAN. What I have discovered is, that the module in question can be loaded more than once on the PulseAudio Server, as long as each instance of it listens on a different port number. I.e., the second instance can be configured to listen on port 4318 instead of the default, port 4317. The configuration lines which accomplish this are as follows:

 


load-module module-native-protocol-tcp port=4317 auth-ip-acl=127.0.0.0/8;192.168.2.0/24 auth-anonymous=true auth-cookie-enabled=false

load-module module-native-protocol-tcp port=4318 auth-ip-acl=127.0.0.0/8;192.168.2.0/24 auth-anonymous=true auth-cookie-enabled=false


 

I realize that the legacy Port Number which the PulseAudio Server listens on by default, is 4713. But in Computing, it’s generally impossible for two programs to be listening on the same Port. Therefore this module listens on a different Port Number, just because PulseAudio is already running.

The command ‘pactl list modules‘ confirms that both instances are loaded and stable. Further, when the video-player ‘xine’ is finished with its connection to the server, it closes the TCP Port in a way that does not corrupt the module, so that ‘xine’ can be started a second time and will cause sound to play for the second time.

What this last observation seems to suggest is that the so-called relinquishing of the Local Sound Sink by ‘Klexel’, a Debian 9.11 computer, is corrupted, and not the behaviour of the actual module on the PulseAudio Server, also running on a Debian 9.11 computer.

This is good news. :-)

Screenshot from 2019-09-09 23-45-49

Continue reading Technical Impediment In Getting Sound From My Linux Tablet (Solved)

Just Installed Kanotix Steelfire on one of my Boxes

For more than a week, I was worried about Kanotix, because their Web-site was down. But after just checking today, I found it was up again! :-)  It has been a habit of mine to install initial Debian systems, from Kanotix Live Disks.

I already posses a powerful computer which I name ‘Plato’, onto which I installed Debian / Stretch by way of an experimental Live Disk from Kanotix, but cannot fully say that that one is a Kanotix computer, because at the time, Kanotix didn’t have an official Debian / Stretch release yet. What I did have was two systems running the slightly older Debian / Jessie, and the official Kanotix release with that, is called “Kanotix Spitfire”.

But what I also had for some time, was a weaker PC that still had Debian / Lenny on it, which was an antique system, that required its own security measures, just not to pose a vulnerability to me.

My special security measure for that computer, was just never to turn it on. In fact, it had no eligible Web-browser. But like that, because the hardware was still good, this represented wasted hardware, just sitting in my computer room.

So, now that the Kanotix site is back up, what I did was to download a 32-bit, LXDE Disk Image, of “Kanotix Steelfire”, which is by now their official Debian / Stretch release. In principle many people, including Kanotix experts, would agree that it makes more sense to use as desktop manager, Plasma 5, but as it happens, the computer that just received a new O/S is so weak in terms of RAM and graphics chip-set, that I didn’t think it could handle Plasma 5.

The newly-set-up computer used to be named ‘Walnut’, but is now to be named ‘Klexel’. It has as graphics acceleration, an old Intel chip-set, which Kanotix distributions actually support, in the form of ‘i915 support’. This is neither an Nvidia, nor an AMD/ATI chip-set. But amazingly, I do have some level of direct-rendering with it, and, in addition, I have Compiz Fusion on that box now, and at least, the 3D desktop-switching belonging to Compiz works!

So now, with ‘Klexel’ wiped, I can take my time with it, and install what I think it should have. But what will slow me down a bit, is the fact that I’m not used to LXDE as a main window-manager. In the past I goofed around with LXDE a bit, but now, this is going to be Klexel’s window manager, under which the GUI is arranged differently, from what I’m used to.

(Update 09/09/2019, 15h50 … )

(As of 09/01/2018, 21h35 : )

Continue reading Just Installed Kanotix Steelfire on one of my Boxes