Why a Hard-Boot is often Overkill.

In order to understand this posting, the reader first needs to understand something, about how the (volatile) memory in a computer is organized. Through the use of virtual addresses, it gets organized into user-space and kernel-space. User-space includes programs that run with elevated privileges, but also the GUI-programs that display widgets and the like on the screen. Kernel-space is reserved for the kernel of the O/S, as well as for kernel-modules, that act as device drivers in practice.

But in addition to that, modern architectures also have I/O chips – which the kernel modules would be responsible for – that run “firmware”. These more-complex I/O chips will often perform complex tasks, such as the encryption built-in to Bluetooth, without requiring that these tasks run on the CPU, or in RAM. In order to do that, I/O chips capable of doing so need a smaller program of instructions, that actually run on the I/O chip. This program is typically no longer than 1-2 KB.

(Edit 06/09/2017 :

I suppose the fact should also be acknowledged, that in order for the firmware actually to do anything, the I/O chip should also have a somewhat larger region of memory – call it a Buffer – which stores data and not code. In the case of an intelligent Bluetooth chip, that buffer would logically store whatever encryption keys are currently being applied to data, which is being streamed to and from the chip… )

So in practice, a situation which the user can run in to, is that by unpairing all his (external) Bluetooth devices, and then turning Bluetooth Off from the settings GUI, and next turning BT back On, he can Fail to Reset the Bluetooth system to its original state. The user only gets to see what the GUI is showing him – which is being controlled by programs running in user-space.

What the user may not realize, is that the way kernel-space is often organized, turning Bluetooth Off in user-space, will fail to unload the kernel-module itself, responsible for operating the Bluetooth Chip, that has firmware running on it, for the sake of argument.

The actual kernel-modules first load when the computer boots up, and the first thing they do, if they are of the sort that use firmware, is to load that firmware onto the I/O chip – and it’s often patches to the firmware that get loaded, because the default firmware is burned-in to the I/O chip.

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