WordPress Update Went Smoothly Today.

I run a localized version of , that partially comes from my Linux package manager, but that has been modified by me, to allow me to install the plug-ins and extensions from .

Therefore, whenever an update to the core files is available from Debian Team – from the package manager – I am a little apprehensive, that the way this update is carried out might not be compatible with my customizations.

Most of the time, updates are good, but on occasion, they may break things.

Today an update to the core package came through the package manager, which technically puts my version at ‘‘. I am sure that there are benefits to users like me. But most importantly, it seems that this update did not break anything. Yay!

Also, I am not recording any down-time, because as far as I can tell, I was able to display a Maintenance Mode page, while the update took place, which would have told readers that the site is undergoing maintenance, for a few minutes.

Dirk

P.S. I also had to restart my ‘‘ daemon after that, the purpose of which is to introduce caching on my side – on the server – to speed up retrieval of whatever readers are interested in most often. Because this cache has therefore been flushed, some of the pages and postings may load a little slowly for the next day or two.

(Edit 02/03/2017 : ) I have begun to notice some functional changes in the behavior of WordPress, that I believe stem from this update. In short, the new version seems to use my caching daemon more consistently, than the previous build did.

Continue reading WordPress Update Went Smoothly Today.

Core Update Tonight, Downtime

This evening, a very deep upgrade was pushed through the package repositories, affecting my computer. This update included 108 packages, included the core C libraries, and converted my Debian 8.6 system into a Debian 8.7 system. Such an update requires we do a reboot, even though we are using Linux.

Because I host my Web-site on my private server at home, this meant that my site and blog were offline from about 22h40 until 22h50. Further, even though my ‘WordPress’ blogging engine has a ‘Maintenance Mode’ window that in can display, this window requires that the Web-server be running to display, while maybe maintenance work could be underway on WordPress itself. Therefore, it was not an option for me to display this, because my whole Apache server was briefly offline.

I hope that this 10-minute interruption did not pose an inconvenience to any of my readers.

Having said all that, it looks on the surface as though the upgrade was a success, and was not botched in any way – thus only the very short reboot interval.

Oh yes. Because my caching daemon was also restarted, the Web-server aspect of this blog will be slightly slow for the next day or so.

Dirk

 

Routine Theme Update Today

Any reader of my blog will notice, that I did not code this HTML by hand. I use bundled software named ““, and I use a version of it similar to what is offered at . This blogging tool is very sophisticated – in my opinion – and extensible through plug-ins and other extensions. I can install updates and extensions, even though my version of the core engine is a Debian / Linux -packaged, localized version.

One of the features of any one blog is its Theme. Though not a plug-in, the Theme plays an important role. It defines the general ‘look and feel’ of any one blog, thereby defining the general layout in the browser of the reader. It is also the Theme, which will determine how easy or difficult it may be, to read a blog on a mobile device – given that many people no longer connect to the Internet as much as they used to, using a PC or even a laptop.

I use the theme. Just today, it received an Update, from version 1.6 to 1.7 . As far as I can tell, this update took place without incident, and should not affect your reading experience in any way.

Yet, there was one step which I needed to take during this update. I needed to flush the cache I provide with ‘‘. This was to prevent readers from receiving any HTML fragments, which would still have belonged to Theme version 1.6 . Therefore, because of this cache restart – on my server, not on your browser – the response to some of the queries of the reader will be a tad slower for several days, since it is the cache on my server, which accelerates the output of specific HTML, which was already formed the last time the same article was requested from my server.

Dirk

 

Routine MySQL Update Successful Today

I use a system for updating my packages, which is named ‘unattended-upgrades’, and which I have blogged about before Here.

This morning, that system updated my MySQL server, which is also important to this blog, because these blog entries are in fact stored in a MySQL database. The way my blog generally works, each HTTP request causes a PHP script to be executed independently on the Apache server, and the PHP extensions I have installed, include a MySQL client. This part of the PHP scripts fetches the blog content, while other parts of the scripts format it as HTML, according to the Theme which I have chosen to install some time ago.

The individual blog entries do not actually form separate files or folders on my Web-site.

Also, it is an explicit WordPress Plug-In, which tries to retrieve the already-formed HTML from my server cache, If the HTML being requested has been cached. That Plug-In is named ‘Memcached Is Your Friend‘.

The fact that my blog still displays properly, indicates that the MySQL database is operating normally. After the upgrade, the scripts also restarted this server briefly. And, the fact that this server has been restarted, does not affect the cache, nor the speed of the blog, because the ‘memcached’ daemon is a separate process which did not receive any update or restart.

Dirk