An affirmation of a concept that exists in Calculus 2, the Integral of (1/x).

There are certain concepts in Calculus 2, which introduces definite and indefinite integrals, that are taught to College and University Students, and which are actually considered to be basic information in Higher Math. One of them is, that the integral of (1/x) is the natural logarithm of (x).

Yet, some people just like to go around and dispute such things, much as the concept is popular, that (2+2) does not equal (4). And so, what I have just done is to ignore the obvious fact, that people who studied Calculus at a much higher level than I have, have found an analytical proof, and to ask the question:

‘What would happen if the integrals of simple power functions were given, that have powers slightly more-negative and slightly more-positive than (-1), in relation to this accepted answer, the natural logarithm of (x)?’ The accepted answer should always fall between those two curves, even if some plausible arbitrary constant is added to each power-function integral, such as one which sets all the functions to equal zero, when the parameter equals one. Not only that, but it’s easy for me to plot some functions. And so, the following two worksheets have resulted:

Testing the Integral of (1/x) – EPUB File for Mobile Devices

Testing the Integral of (1/x) – PDF File for Desktop and Laptop Computers

Further, I’d just like to remind the reader, that a function can easily be defined that follows a continuous line, except at one parameter-value, at which it has a different value, such that the neighbouring intervals in the domain of said function do not include this endpoint, in either case. The only question which remains is, whether that function is a correct answer to a question. And, because such functions are possible, the answer depends on additional information, to the idea that there are exceptions to how this function is to be computed.

(Update 1/26/2020, 20h20 : )

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