Dealing with a picture frame that freezes.

I recently bought myself a (1920×1080 pixel) digital picture frame, that had rave reviews among other customers, but that began the habit of freezing after about 12 hours of continuous operation, with my JPEG Images on its SD Card.

This could signal that there is some sort of hardware error, including in the internal logic, or of the SD Card itself. And one of the steps which I took to troubleshoot this problem was, to try saving the ‘.jpg’ Files to different SD Cards, and once even, to save those pictures to a USB Key, since the picture frame in question accepts a USB Memory Stick. All these efforts resulted in the same behaviour. This brought me back to the problem, that there could be some sort of data-error, i.e., of the JPEG Files in question already being corrupted, as they were stored on my hard drives. I had known of this possibility, and so I already tried the following:

 


find . -type f -name '*.jpg' | jpeginfo -c -f - | grep -v 'OK'

 

Note: To run this command requires that the Debian package ‘jpeginfo’ be installed, which was not installed out-of-the-box on my computer.

This is the Linux way to find JPEG Files that Linux deems to be corrupted. But, aside from some trivial issues which this command found, and which I was easily able to correct, Linux deemed all the relevant JPEG Files to be clean.

And this is where my thinking became more difficult. I was not looking for a quick reimbursement for the picture frame, and continued to operate on the assumption that mine was working as well, as the frames that other users had given such good reviews for. And so, another type of problem came to my attention, which I had run in to previously, in a way that I could be sure of. Sometimes Linux will find media files to be ‘OK’, that non-Linux software (or embedded firmware) deems to be unacceptable. And with my collection of 253 photos, all it would take is one such photo, which, as soon as the frame selected it to be viewed, could still have caused the frame to crash.

(Updated 1/16/2020, 17h15 … )

Continue reading Dealing with a picture frame that freezes.

A butterfly is being oppressed by 6 evil spheroids!

As this previous posting of mine chronicles, I have acquired an Open-Source Tool, which enables me to create 3D / CGI content, and to distribute that in the form of a WebGL Scene.

The following URL will therefore test the ability of the reader’s browser more, to render WebGL properly:

http://dirkmittler.homeip.net/WebGL/Marbles6.html

And this is a complete rundown of my source files:

http://dirkmittler.homeip.net/WebGL


 

(Updated 01/07/2020, 17h00 … )

(As of 01/04/2020, 22h35 : )

On one of my alternate computers, I also have Firefox ESR running under Linux, and that browser was reluctant to Initialize WebGL. There is a workaround, but I’d only try it if I’m sure that graphics hardware / GPU is strong on a given computer, and properly installed, meaning, stable…

Continue reading A butterfly is being oppressed by 6 evil spheroids!

Using MPD with Cantata.

One of the common ways in which Linux users have been playing music on their computers has been a traditional way, which would be, with an application that has a GUI, and which runs in their user-space, and which therefore has access to a personal music folder. ‘Clementine’ and ‘Amarok’ are only two out of several applications which do this under Linux. But there is another way to stream music through a Linux computer, in the form of the “Music Player Daemon” (‘MPD’), that can be configured to run in the root file system, as a system process, and in the background, while using up far less RAM or CPU cycles than either of the top-heavy, GUI-driven apps use. And one good place to use such an arrangement is, if we want to have ‘relaxation music’ playing through our life space, but again, without taking up much in the way of resources on whichever computer is generating the sound output.

‘MPD’ itself has no user interface and is configured in a single configuration file, in the case when it is not configured per-user. Therefore, one thing that users and admins alike might do – but mainly plain users – is to install one out of numerous MPD Client programs, and the client program which I chose happens to have a GUI:

Screenshot_20191124_164918

This front-end is named ‘Cantata’.

There already exist good references on the Web, on How to configure an ‘MPD’ system process, just using a Text Editor, and the command-line. (Yes, the stock client is installed with a package named ‘mpc’, and is driven from the command-line.) I think that the article which I just linked to is well-written, and that its author seems very knowledgeable.

The only problem with the article linked to above is, that the author just forgot to explain one fact. Not knowing this fact, and being new to how ‘MPD’ works, cost me several hours close to midnight on one recent day. I found this fact written in exactly one other article on the Web. Just so that other users do not suffer from the distress that can be caused, because they, too may want to run ‘MPD’, but caused, from not knowing this fact, I just decided to create the second spot on the Web that I know of, which mentions it…

(This fact concerns a possible problem in using ‘MPD’, due to which a single user’s private Music Collection does not want to appear.)

(Updated 11/26/2019, 13h05 … )

Continue reading Using MPD with Cantata.

PulseAudio Restart Bug – Solved

I enjoy my Linux computers, and one reason is the fact that many technical issues can be resolved, without having to reboot endlessly. However, in my past usage, there has been an irritating exception to this pattern. It’s common under Linux, that we can simply restart the PulseAudio Server from the command-line, using one out of several methods, and that the subject should be done with. But alas, every time I have ever restarted PulseAudio in this way, or, if the server restarted on its own, afterwards, when looking up the Plasma 5 -generated status display (which is actually referred to as “Phonon”), I’d be missing a Devices List, like so:

Screenshot_20191026_152751

This type of display can be interpreted to mean several things, such as, that the PulseAudio server did restart, but that perhaps, it simply failed to connect to the inter-process, session-unique, message-bus. Therefore, in the past, whenever I had such a display, I eventually did what I thought I had to do, which was, to log out and back in again, or, to reboot. On my system, PulseAudio is configured such, that it runs as one user-name, and not as root.

In fact, a peculiar side effect of this bug was, that the list of available output devices was still being displayed, within ‘pavucontrol‘.

But this ordeal has now become even more inconvenient than it ever was because on the computer which I name ‘Phosphene’, the need may recur more frequently, ‘just to restart the PulseAudio server’.

However, I have finally found the true cause for this malfunction, which was, that when PulseAudio is restarted from within an existing session, it simply fails to load one module, which is also the module that it needs, in order to be able to list the available devices:

 


module-device-manager

 

In fact, there exists a script in ‘/usr/bin‘, that loads a series of X11-related modules.

Therefore, after a restart of this service, I can simply give the following command now:

 


/usr/bin/start-pulseaudio-x11

 

And Eureka! I can now obtain a list of available devices, without ever having to log out and back in, or, without ever having to reboot:

Screenshot_20191026_152853

In fact, I have created a shell-script, which I can click on as user, and which carries out this task, safely.


 

I’ve also discovered that the ‘ProjectM’ music visualization application still works, and detects the beat of the playing music as before. What this means is that theoretically, after ‘ProjectM’ was installed, instead of rebooting, I could have just restarted the PulseAudio server as described here, to get that working.


 

( Edited 2019/10/29, 23h35 … )

I know that there exists an unrelated problem, that just happens to give the same appearance within ‘Phonon’, but that cannot be resolved in this way…

Continue reading PulseAudio Restart Bug – Solved