Getting the integrated equalizer to work, from Debian Jessie, KDE 4.

I happen to have an older laptop, which I name ‘Klystron’, that is running Debian 8 / Jessie, with KDE 4 as its desktop manager. Don’t ask me why, but I tend to leave older builds of Linux running on some of my computers, just because they seem to be running without any deficiencies.

That laptop has lousy speakers. I decided a few days ago, that it would benefit, if I could get the 14-band graphical equalizer to work, that is generally available on Linux computers which, like that laptop, use the ‘PulseAudio’ sound server. However, on this old version of Linux, achieving that was a bit harder than it’s supposed to be. Yet, because I succeeded, I felt that I should share with the community, what the steps were, needed to succeed.

First of all, this is what the equalizer looks like, which I can now open on that laptop:

Equalizer_1

And it works!

 

In order to get this sort of equalizer working with PulseAudio, eventually, the following two modules need to be loaded:

module-equalizer-sink

module-dbus-protocol

And, if I gave the command ‘load-module…’ naively from the command-line, as user, because under my builds of Linux, PulseAudio runs in user mode, both these modules seem to load fine, without my having to install any additional packages.

On more recent builds of Linux, one needs to install the package ‘pulseaudio-equalizer’ to obtain this feature, or some similarly-named package. But, because these two modules just loaded fine under Debian / Jessie, I guess the functionality once came integrated with PulseAudio.

But I soon started to run in to trouble with these modules, and discovered why, then, the equalizer function was not set up to run out-of-the-box…

(Updated 6/26/2020, 10h30… )

Continue reading Getting the integrated equalizer to work, from Debian Jessie, KDE 4.

Changing the <Alt>+(LMB-Drag) behaviour of Linux, under the Plasma 5 desktop manager.

One of the realities of many graphics / editing applications is, that the action to drag either an object or one of its handles with a mouse, or with any other pointing-device, needs to be modified in several ways, depending on what, exactly, the user expects the application to do. I have recently encountered a Web-application, which therefore displays in a Web-browser, in which to hold down the Shift-Key while dragging the corner of a rectangle does one thing, holding down the Ctrl-Key while doing so does another, and holding down the Alt-Key performs yet-another action, which in this case was, to draw an ellipse instead of a rectangle. And in this Web-application, the ability to draw circles or ellipses would eventually become important.

The problem with any application that has this as one of the inputs it accepts, is that such applications were never designed with Linux in mind. The reason is the fact that, under Linux desktop-managers, to <Alt>+(LMB-Drag) gets intercepted, and has as effect to drag the entire application window. That Web-application never receives such a combination of inputs.

Fortunately, if the desktop-manager is one of the ‘Plasma 5′ sub-versions, there is a way to change that behaviour. It can be found under:

System Settings -> Application Style -> Widgets Style and Behaviour -> Applications Tab -> (Breeze Theme from Drop-Down) -> (To the right of the theme chosen from the Drop-Down) Configure… -> General Tab -> Windows’ drag mode -> (From the drop-down) ‘…Titlebar Only’.

That last drop-down is not wide enough to show its full text.

The reason this defaults to ‘Anywhere from within the window’, is a fear that might exist, that an application’s window could end up very-incorrectly positioned on the screen, and that a user might not be able to change that position, by the next time he starts the application. I.e., some applications remember their window-position from one session to the next, and it could be screwed up. If this behaviour is changed, <Alt>+(LMB-Drag) will only drag the window, and therefore be intercepted before it reaches the application, if the mouse-pointer can be positioned over the window’s title-bar.

Continue reading Changing the <Alt>+(LMB-Drag) behaviour of Linux, under the Plasma 5 desktop manager.

Latest Debian Security Update Breaks Jessie (Resolved).

In addition to my Debian / Stretch computer, I still operate two Debian / Jessie computers. Those latter two computers were subscribed to the Debian Security repository, as well as to the standard Debian / Jessie repository. Unfortunately, the package manager on one of my Debian / Jessie computers had made me aware of a conflict which existed, due to an update which Debian Security is pushing, to a package and its related packages, all belonging to:

liqt4-dev

The version which Debian Security is trying to install is:

4:4.8.6+git64-g5dc8b2b+dfsg-3+deb8u2

But, the version which the rest of Debian / Jessie was using, was:

4:4.8.6+git64-g5dc8b2b+dfsg-3+deb8u1

The problem was the fact that, if I told my package manager to go ahead with its suggested updates, doing so would have forced me to reject a long, long list of packages essential to my system, including many KDE-4-related packages. Now, I can just ignore that this problem exists, and rely on my package manager again not installing packages, that would break my system, on a daily basis. But this would turn into a very unsafe practice in the long run. And so, the only safe course of action for me currently seemed to be, to unsubscribe from Debian / Security instead.

(Update 17h55 : )

I have resubscribed to the Debian Security repository in question, and re-attempted the update, to find that this time, it worked. I can think of 2 possible reasons why it might not have worked the first time:

  1. My unattended-upgrades script is configured to break up an update into smaller pieces, and because this update involves a large number (over 20) of Qt 4 packages, this in itself could have broken the ability to perform the update, or
  2. Debian Security may not have put all the involved updates ‘out there’ on its servers, to be downloadable in one shot, even though every Qt 4 package needs to be updated, in order for any of the updates to succeed. But, only hours later, all the required packages may have become available (on the servers).

I rather think that it was due to reason (2) and not reason (1) above.

Dirk

 

KdeWallet, and Using Smb4K, under Plasma 5

One fact which I’ve written about before, is that I have an up-to-date Linux computer, that uses the ‘Plasma 5′ desktop manager, which is actually the successor to ‘KDE 4′. When using this desktop manager, we can still install numerous packages that ‘belong’ to the old, KDE 4, and most of them will continue to work. One of those is ‘smb4k’, which is a point-and-click utility, to mount a network SMB share – aka, a Windows-file-share, such that it will be visible in our home folder, as though that share was a local sub-folder.

There exist command-line methods to do the same thing, which would mount that network share, and declare it’s of the ‘cifs’ file-system-type, but the use of a simple GUI to do so may be easier.

But then one problem which ensues, is that Smb4K will use the KDE 4 Wallet, to store our password, for that share. It will function in this way, by depending on the package ‘kde-runtime’. In truth, this latter package probably pulls in numerous (old) KDE 4 libraries, and not just the old KWallet, but the existence of this KDE 4 Wallet, on our Plasma 5 machine, is most obvious…

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