Dealing with a picture frame that freezes.

I recently bought myself a (1920×1080 pixel) digital picture frame, that had rave reviews among other customers, but that began the habit of freezing after about 12 hours of continuous operation, with my JPEG Images on its SD Card.

This could signal that there is some sort of hardware error, including in the internal logic, or of the SD Card itself. And one of the steps which I took to troubleshoot this problem was, to try saving the ‘.jpg’ Files to different SD Cards, and once even, to save those pictures to a USB Key, since the picture frame in question accepts a USB Memory Stick. All these efforts resulted in the same behaviour. This brought me back to the problem, that there could be some sort of data-error, i.e., of the JPEG Files in question already being corrupted, as they were stored on my hard drives. I had known of this possibility, and so I already tried the following:

 


find . -type f -name '*.jpg' | jpeginfo -c -f - | grep -v 'OK'

 

Note: To run this command requires that the Debian package ‘jpeginfo’ be installed, which was not installed out-of-the-box on my computer.

This is the Linux way to find JPEG Files that Linux deems to be corrupted. But, aside from some trivial issues which this command found, and which I was easily able to correct, Linux deemed all the relevant JPEG Files to be clean.

And this is where my thinking became more difficult. I was not looking for a quick reimbursement for the picture frame, and continued to operate on the assumption that mine was working as well, as the frames that other users had given such good reviews for. And so, another type of problem came to my attention, which I had run in to previously, in a way that I could be sure of. Sometimes Linux will find media files to be ‘OK’, that non-Linux software (or embedded firmware) deems to be unacceptable. And with my collection of 253 photos, all it would take is one such photo, which, as soon as the frame selected it to be viewed, could still have caused the frame to crash.

(Updated 1/16/2020, 17h15 … )

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VDPAU Playback Issue (Problem Solved).

One of the facts which apply to Linux computing is, that NVIDIA created an API, which allows for certain video-streams to be played back in a way accelerated by the GPU, instead of all the video decoding taking place on the CPU. And, users don’t necessarily need to have an NVIDIA graphics card, in order for certain graphics drivers to offer this feature, which is called ‘VDPAU’, an acronym that stands for “Video Decode and Playback API for Unix”. Simultaneously, what some Linux users can do, is to experiment with shell-scripts that allow us to click on a specific Application Window, in order to perform screen-capture on that Window for a specified number of seconds, ad then to compress the resulting stream into MP4, AVI, or MPG -Files, once the screen-capture has finished. This latter piece of magic can be performed using elaborate ‘ffmpeg’ commands, which would need to be a part of the script in question. And in recent days, I’ve been tweaking such scripts.

But then an odd behaviour crept up. My NVIDIA graphics card supports the real-time playback of MPEG-1, MPEG-2, DIVX and H.264 -encoded streams, with GPU-acceleration. Yet, when I clicked on the resulting animations, depending on which player I chose to play those with, I’d either obtain the video stream, or I’d just obtain a grey rectangle, replacing the captured video stream. And what I do know, is that which of these results I obtain, depends on whether I’m playing back the video stream using a software decoder purely, or whether I’m choosing to have the stream played back with GPU-acceleration.

I’ve run in to the same problem before, but this time, the cause was elsewhere.

Basically, this result will often mean that the player application first asks the graphics card, whether the latter can decode the stream in question, and when the VDPAU API responds ‘Yes’, hands over the relevant processing to the GPU, but for some unknown reason, the GPU fails to decode the stream. This result can sometimes have a different meaning, but I knew I needed to focus my attention on this interpretation.

Linux users will often need to have some sort of file-format, in which they can store arbitrary video-clips, that do not need to conform to strict broadcasting and distribution standards, even when the goal is ‘just to monkey around with video clips’.

I finally found what the culprit was…

(Updated 8/15/2019, 22h15 … )

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How the EPUB2 and MOBI formats can be used for typeset Math.

According to This preceding posting, I was experiencing some frustration over trying to typeset Math, for publication in EPUB2 format. EPUB3 format with MathML support was a viable alternative, though potentially hard on any readers I might have.

Well a situation exists in which either EPUB2 or MOBI can be used to publish typeset Math: Each lossless image can claim the entire width of a column of text, and each image can represent an entire equation. That way, the content of the document can alternate vertically between Text and Typeset Math.

In fact, if an author was to choose to do this, he or she could also use the Linux-based solutions ‘LyX’ , ‘ImageMagick’ , and ‘tex4ebook’ .

(Edited 1/9/2019, 15h35 … )

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