The failings of low-end consumer software, to typeset Math as (HTML) MathML.

One of the features which HTML5 has, and which many Web-browsers support, is the ability to typeset Mathematical formulae, which is known as ‘MathML’. Actually, MathML is an extension of XML, which also happens to be supported when inserted into HTML.

The “WiKiPedia” uses some such solution, partially because they need their formulae to look as sharp as possible at any resolution, but also, because they’d only have so much capacity, to store many, many image-files. In fact, the WiKiPedia uses a number of lossless techniques, to store sharp images as well as formulae. ( :1 )

But from a personal perspective, I’d appreciate a GUI, which allows me to export MathML. It’s fine to learn the syntax and code the HTML by hand, but in my life, the number of syntax-variations I’d need to invest to learn, would be almost as great, as the total number of software-packages I have installed, since each software-package, potentially uses yet-another syntax.

What I find however, is that if our software is open-source, very little of it will actually export to MathML. It would be very nice if we could get our Linux-based LaTeX engines, to export to this format, in a way that specifically preserves Math well. But what I find is, even though I posses a powerful GUI to help me manage various LaTeX renderings, that GUI being named “Kile”, that GUI relies back on a simple command-line tool named ‘latex2html’. Whatever that command-line outputs, that’s what all of Kile will output, if we tell it to render LaTeX specifically to HTML. ‘latex2html’ in turn, depends on ‘netpbm’, which counts as very old, legacy software.

One reason ‘latex2html’ will fail us, is the fact that in general, its intent is to render LaTeX, but not Math in any specific way. And so, just to posses the .TEX Files, will not guarantee a Linux user, that his resulting HTML will be stellar. ‘latex2html’ will generally output PNG Images, and will embed those images in the HTML File, on the premise that aside from the rasterization, PNG Format is lossless. Further, if the LaTeX code was generated by “wxMaxima”, using its ‘pdfLaTeX’ export format, we end up with incorrectly-aligned syntax, just because that dialect of LaTeX has been optimized by wxMaxima, for use in generating .PDF Files next.

(Updated 05/27/2018 : )

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Revisiting HTML, this time, With CSS.

When I first taught myself HTML, it was in the 1990s, and not only has the technology advanced, but the philosophy behind Web-design has also changed. The original philosophy was, that the Web-page should only contain the information, and that each Web-browser should define in what style that information should be displayed. But of course, when Cascading Style-Sheets were invented – which in today’s laconic vocabulary are just referred to as “Styles” – they represented a full reversal of that philosophy, since by nature, they control the very appearance of the page, from the server.

My own knowledge of HTML has been somewhat limited. I’ve bought cuspy books about ‘CSS’ as well as about ‘JQuery’, but have never made the effort to read each book from beginning to end. I mainly focused on what some key concepts are, in HTML5 and CSS.

Well recently I’ve become interested in HTML5 and CSS again, and have found, that to buy the Basic license of a WYSIWYG-editor named “BlueGriffon“, proved informative. I do have access to some open-source HTML editors, but find that even if they come as a WYSIWIG-editor, they mainly tend to produce static pages, very similar to what Web-masters were already creating in the 1990s. In the open-source domain, maybe a better example would be “SeaMonkey“. Beyond that, ‘KompoZer‘ can no longer be made to run on up-to-date 64-bit systems, and while “BlueFish”, a pronouncedly KDE-centric solution available from the package-manager, does offer advanced capabilities, it only does so in the form of an IDE.

(Updated 03/09/2018, 17h10 : )

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