Disabling upowerd on a Desktop Linux computer that never actually had a battery.

One of the facts which I’d like to make sure the reader knows, is what, exactly, the process ‘upowerd’ is responsible for on any Linux computer, lest the reader disable something that he or she may really need.

Many computers, including laptops, have batteries. ‘upowerd’ is the Linux process that monitors the battery, or the batteries, in case there is more than one to monitor. If the computer has batteries to monitor, then this process is essential and should not be disabled. But, in certain specific other cases, this process can become a problem, as it recently was on my desktop computer named ‘Phosphene’, which is running Debian 9 / Stretch, which has Plasma 5.8 as its desktop manager, and which will only ever run on A/C power, due to the very way in which its hardware is designed.

Several months ago, I noticed that the ‘North Bridge’ of this computer – an essential chip on its motherboard – was becoming rather hot. And the motherboard in question, the ‘Sabertooth X58′, manufactured in the year 2011, was already famous for the design flaw that causes its North Bridge to become 76.5⁰C hot when idle, which is actually hotter than the GPU on that computer will normally become, when pressed to work hard. Several Months ago, the North Bridge temperature when idle was 80⁰C or even 81⁰C! Whether it’s actually safe for a chip to be that hot is a subject open to opinion. This temperature will not cause an immediate failure, but if the chip is so hot continuously, then its lifespan will become shorter, than what the lifespan of chips is supposed to be, in general.

Therefore, months ago, when I first noticed this, I opened up the tower / desktop computer and examined it, to look for failed cooling fans, etc. There was no such cause for the elevated NB temperature. Not being able to remedy the problem, I just left it that way.

But only yesterday, I noticed that the process ‘upowerd’ was consuming an inordinate amount of CPU time. On the octa-core machine, that process was consuming maybe 1% of available CPU time, which was quite a lot, considering that there should have been nothing for it to do. And, never having noticed this before, it seemed possible to me that ‘upowerd’ may have been consuming 1% of available CPU time (unnoticed), since months ago.

When ‘upowerd’ misbehaves in this way, sometimes this happens, because of hardware signals, such as perhaps, a battery which continuously disconnects and reconnects, etc… Therefore, before a software kludge is attempted, all possibilities need to be followed, to find hardware causes for this behaviour, to which ‘upowerd’ would simply be responding in a normal fashion. Yet, even given hardware reasons to be active, ‘upowerd’ should not be consuming much more than 1% of available CPU time, in case the reader has some situation where this process is consuming, say, 10% of the CPU.

Continue reading Disabling upowerd on a Desktop Linux computer that never actually had a battery.