Setting Up VESAFB Under GRUB2

In This Earlier Posting, I had written, that I switched to the proprietary nVidia graphics-drivers on the computer I name ‘Plato’, but that for the purposes of managing several console-sessions using

  • <Ctrl>+<Alt>+F1 ,
  • <Ctrl>+<Alt>+F7

My customary solution, to set up ‘uvesafb‘, no longer works. What happens is that everything runs fine, until the command is given to switch back to the X-server session, at which point the system crashes. Thus, as I had left it at first, console-sessions were available, but at some horribly-low default resolution (without ‘uvesafb’). This had to be remedied, and the way I chose to solve this was actually to use the older ‘vesafb’, which is not a 3rd-party frame-buffer ‘device’, but rather a set of kernel-instructions / kernel-settings, which can be specified in the file ‘/etc/default/grub’.

Because my computers use ‘GRUB2′, the most-elegant way to solve this problem would be, to put the following two lines / uncomment and adapt, like so:

 


GRUB_GFXMODE=1920x1080
GRUB_GFXPAYLOAD_LINUX="keep"


 

But, on ‘Plato’, this solution was not available, because 1920×1080 was not an available frame-buffer resolution. On this machine, I’d need to have set the highest-possible VESA resolution first, and then have been in the position of having to state next, whether to use “keep” or some other, available resolution, actually to start Linux.

This might have resulted in a ‘lightdm’ log-in screen, set to an unsuitable resolution, all the way until the user logs in, and the Plasma 5 desktop manager re-establishes his or her personal, desktop-resolution – just because, 1920×1080 was not available from the GRUB.

Instead, the following first command reveals which frame-buffer resolutions are available on any one machine, and then it’s still possible today, to give the option ” vga=#” , using the exact code which was provided by the first command:

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