Pursuing the question of, whether a Linux subsystem, that runs under Android, due to the UserLAnd app, can be used for Web development.

It was a subject which I wrote about several months, or years ago, that I had installed the “UserLAnd” app on my Google Pixel C Tablet, so that I could install Debian Linux on it. And a question which one reader had asked me was, whether such an arrangement could be used, to carry out Web development. In fact, some question existed, as to whether proprietary software could be made to run, and my answer was, that it would be preferred to run only Free, Open-Source Software.

In the meantime, I’ve uninstalled Linux from the Pixel C, and installed it on my Samsung Galaxy Tab S6, which has 256GB of internal storage, so that this question can be examined more seriously.

The answer I’d give to this question is, that Web-development can be done in this way, as long as the developer accepts some severe restrictions.

  • Successful development of any kind will depend on whether the user has a real keyboard to type on.
  • The Open-Source application “Bluefish” runs out-of-the box, which is more than I can say for any sort of Python IDE.
  • Because there is little possibility to run a Web-server on the tablet, the features which Bluefish would normally have, to edit PHP Scripts as well, will simply need to be ignored. The ability to preview the Web-pages written, depends on the Guest System’s Firefox browser following the ‘prooted’ Guest System’s Filename-Paths, so that, when Bluefish opens Firefox, the HTML File will essentially be opened as if from the hard drive. And the feature works…

 

Screenshot_20200924-052525_VNC Viewer

Screenshot_20200924-052618_VNC Viewer

 

The main reason I would say, not to invest in paid-for software on this platform, is, because its full potential will not be realized.

The HTML and CSS Files created in this way will next need to be transferred to an actual Web-server, and some of the ways in which Bluefish would be set up on a real Linux box, would make this easier.

 

(Updated 10/03/2020, 4h00: )

Continue reading Pursuing the question of, whether a Linux subsystem, that runs under Android, due to the UserLAnd app, can be used for Web development.

Some perceivable inconsistencies, about whether the embedded worksheets can be viewed.

One of the facts which I did mention in an earlier posting, concern worksheets which I sometimes embedded into my postings as ‘<iframe>s’. In reality, there could be two reasons, why such worksheets fail to display in any one person’s browser:

  1. I could have embedded them, specifying (insecure) URLs that begin with ‘http://’, even though the reader may be visiting my blog, using a (secure) URL that begins with ‘httpS://’. Or,
  2. The posting might suggest that the reader “may need to” enable JavaScript from the domain ‘mathjax.org’, but, in certain cases this is not needed, while in other cases, it is.

‘Problem 1′ above is harder for the reader to fix at their end. It can be solved by fetching my posting using the insecure ‘http://’ URL, or, as I’ve done in a very recent posting, I could decide to embed the ‘<iframe>’ using a URL, which does not specify my domain-name, and just assumes that it’s to be the same, as the domain-name of my site.

‘Problem 2′ above represents a contradiction which may confuse some readers. Sometimes, when I generated an HTML version of a worksheet, I did this by simply clicking on a button, in the GUI of my software. In such cases, the HTML will require that the JavaScript be enabled. But, in certain other cases, all I really did was, to output the worksheet as a LaTeX document, and then to run a custom script on it, to generate other types of documents, one of which would have been an HTML document.

If I ran my custom script on some generic LaTeX document, that generates ‘HTML with equations’, it will do so in the form of ‘a hybrid document’. The resulting document is hybrid, because it can then be viewed in one of two ways:

  1. Using the built-in support for ‘MathML’, that some readers’ browsers have. This is less likely, because I only know of one browser that actually support it: ‘Firefox’. If the reader is using ‘MS Edge’ or the ‘Chrome’ browser to view my posting, I know that they do not support MathML as a built-in feature. But,
  2. Such a hybrid HTML document can also be viewed, by enabling the JavaScript that gets referred to as ‘MathJax’, and which essentially allows other browsers, including ‘MS Edge’ and ‘Chrome’, to view the equations.

I try to accommodate as many possible configurations of the readers’ browsers as I can, but the unfortunate reality is, that merely pressing the GUI button within my application, may generate HTML which is highlighted more nicely, but which is not a hybrid HTML document.

Dirk

 

A butterfly is being oppressed by 6 evil spheroids!

As this previous posting of mine chronicles, I have acquired an Open-Source Tool, which enables me to create 3D / CGI content, and to distribute that in the form of a WebGL Scene.

The following URL will therefore test the ability of the reader’s browser more, to render WebGL properly:

http://dirkmittler.homeip.net/WebGL/Marbles6.html

And this is a complete rundown of my source files:

http://dirkmittler.homeip.net/WebGL


 

(Updated 01/07/2020, 17h00 … )

(As of 01/04/2020, 22h35 : )

On one of my alternate computers, I also have Firefox ESR running under Linux, and that browser was reluctant to Initialize WebGL. There is a workaround, but I’d only try it if I’m sure that graphics hardware / GPU is strong on a given computer, and properly installed, meaning, stable…

Continue reading A butterfly is being oppressed by 6 evil spheroids!

Firefox Quantum now available under Debian Linux

There has been an ongoing subject, concerning Debian distributions of Linux, and Firefox upgrades. The Debian users, at least if they were restricting themselves to standard repositories, were being held back to a version of Firefox, which was referred to as Firefox-ESR, which stands for ‘Extended Support Release’. This release was receiving regular security patches, but no major upgrade in the version number, which meant that it was always at some sub-version of Firefox 52…

Well only yesterday, my two Debian / Stretch computers, which I name ‘Plato’ and ‘Klexel’, finally received a much-anticipated upgrade to Firefox Quantum, which is also known as Firefox-ESR, v60…

screenshot_20180909_114409

I am happy with Firefox Quantum, but perhaps only, because certain earlier, unstable versions of it, never made it into the Debian repositories? There is one observation about this updated browser-version which I need to make. As was announced, Mozilla dropped support for the old, ‘Netscape Plugin API’, which I had still been using to custom-compile plug-ins. Instead of using this API, up-to-date developers are being asked to use the ‘firefox-esr-dev’ package. but alas, the last time I checked, this package was not up to version 60… This package was still at version 52…

Continue reading Firefox Quantum now available under Debian Linux