I now have Linux installed on my Google Pixel C tablet.

As the title of this posting suggests.

I used the Android app “UserLAnd“, which does not require root. The most recent versions of this app offer a VNC Server, which emulates an X-Server within the Linux system. And the implementation of VNC is ‘TightVNC’. Plus, the latest versions of this app offer a built-in VNC Viewer, that I find makes the most, out of the tiny icons that display on the high-res screen, as well as out of the fact that often, users will want to operate the GUI with their fingers, along with the physical keyboard that my Pixel C pairs with (:7) …

Screenshot_20190831-163643

The setup of this Linux Guest System is much easier than my earlier experience was because the basic Linux distribution, the desktop manager, and certain apps can all be installed just by tapping on a few icons. And then, using the ‘sudo apt-get’ command-line, additional Debian packages can be installed.

There is an interesting side effect to this project: When I give the command:

$ cat /etc/debian_version

I obtain the result ‘10.0‘. This would mean that the Linux version which I’m getting, is the new Debian / Buster, which none of my PCs nor my Laptop are even running. However, the repositories that I’m subscribed to are labelled ‘stable’. The CPU is an ‘arm64′. And the desktop manager I chose was ‘LXDE’. I installed a full productivity suite, including LaTeX. But, I found that three Linux applications did not run:

  • LyX – The graphical, WYSIWYM LaTeX Editor (:2).
  • Synaptic – A GUI for apt-get that makes it particularly easy to browse package-repositories, before selecting which packages to install.
  • Latexdraw‘ (:1) (:6).

Everything else I tried seems to work, including “LibreOffice”, “GIMP”, “InkScape”, “Firefox ESR”. On my own, without the aid of simple GUI-buttons, I was also able to install and run “Texmaker”, “Dia”, “Xfig”, “OpenClipArt”, “Maxima” and “wxMaxima”, the Computer Algebra System and its Graphics Front-End. Getting that last item to work properly actually required that I install the package ‘fonts-jsmath’.

The Linux Guest System is currently taking up 5.37GB of my internal storage, and I finally also found out how to share files between the Guest System and the Host System. Within the Guest System, if on the Host System the root of the user folders is ‘/root/<sdcard>’, then this Host System root is mounted at ‘/host-rootfs/<sdcard>’ (within the Guest System). This means that I can open a path directly to this folder in the file-manager ‘PCManFM’, and bookmark it. (:3)

(Updated 9/07/2019, 17h40 … )

Continue reading I now have Linux installed on my Google Pixel C tablet.

Browsing Android Files using Bluetooth

One of the casual uses of Bluetooth under Android, is just to pair devices with our Android (host) device, so that specific apps can use the paired (slave) device. This includes BT-headphones, and many other devices.

But then a slightly more advanced use for BT under Android could be, that we actually send files to a paired Android device. It’s casually possible to take two Android tablets, or a tablet and a phone, and to pair those with each other. After that, the way to ‘push’ a file to the paired device, from the originating device, is to open whichever app displays files – such as for example, the Gallery app, if users still have that installed, or a suitable file-manager app – and to tap on ‘Share’, and then select ‘Bluetooth’ as what to share the file to. Doing this should open a list of paired devices, one of which should be suitable to receive a pushed file in this way.

But then, some people would like to take Bluetooth file-sharing up another level. We can pair our Android device – such as our phone – with a Bluetooth-equipped, Linux computer, which may be a bit tricky in itself, because the GUI we usually use for that assumes some legacy form of pairing. But eventually, we can set up a pairing as described. What I need to do is select the option in my Linux-BT-pairing GUI, which requires me to enter the pass-code into the Linux-GUI, which my Android device next displays…

And then, a question which many users find asking themselves is, ‘Why can’t I obtain FTP-like browsing capability, from my Linux-computer, over the files on the phone? Am I not giving the correct commands, from my Linux-computer?’

Chances are high, that any user who wishes to do this, is already giving the correct commands from his or her Linux-computer…

(Updated 06/03/2018, 20h45 … )

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File-Sharing under Linux, using Usershares – the Modernistic Way.

One concept which readers may already know, is that under Linux, we can set up a Samba-server, which makes the sharing-out of our home directories possible, and that if we fiddle with the ‘smb.conf’ configuration file thoroughly enough, it becomes possible to browse the available shares on a LAN, in a way semi-compatible with Windows computers that also reside on the same LAN.

Traditionally, this has always been a bit of a PITA, especially since the ‘/etc/samba/smb.conf’ configuration files have been finicky, and since each share practically needs to be configured individually, by a person with the ‘root’ password.

Well an alternative exists under Linux as well, which is the concept of ‘Usershares’. With this concept, each user who belongs to a specific group has the privilege, of designating a folder within his desktop manager, to share out, pointing-and-clicking. This is closer in ease-of-use, to how the process works under Windows. But, it needs to be set up correctly once, by the sysadmin, before it will work as often as simple users wish it to work.

I think that an existing Web-article on the subject, already explains well, what the settings in the ‘smb.conf’ file need to be, as well as what directories need to exist, in order for usershares to work. Except that the article I just linked to, refers to Fedora and SELinux systems and their norms. I happen to be based on Debian and KDE 4 or Plasma 5. And so I have a few observations to add:

Firstly, the following packages should be installed, under Debian also:

 


#apt-get install kdenetwork samba

 

Secondly, ‘/etc/samba/smb.conf’ needs to be edited like so:

 

screenshot_20180324_205625

 

Under Debian, the directory ‘/var/lib/samba/usershares’ already exists, If the relevant packages are installed. And its permission-bits have already been set as they should be set. Only, the feature is not configured in ‘smb.conf’ by default. And, the additional package named ‘kdenetwork-filesharing’ needs to be installed, in order for the tab to appear in Dolphin’s File-Properties box, that enables sharing from the GUI. Aside from that, enabled users need to be added to the ‘sambashare’ group, after which this membership only goes into effect, once the user in question has started a new session…

(Info Corrected 03/25/2018, 17h10,

Updated again 03/28/2018 … )

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