I no longer have Compiz-Fusion running on the LXDE-based computer, named ‘Klexel’.

According to this earlier posting, I had run in to stability issues with my newly-reinstalled Linux computer, which I name ‘Klexel’. Well, the only sensible way, finally, to solve those problems, was to deactivate ‘Compiz Fusion’, which is a special window-manager / compositor, that creates a desktop cube animation, as well as certain other effects, chosen by the user out of a long menu of effects, but which needs to run on the graphics hardware, using OpenGL.

Even though Compiz Fusion is fancy and seems like a nice idea, I’ve run in to the following problems with it, in my own experience:

  • Compiz is incompatible with Plasma 5, which is still my preferred desktop manager,
  • If we have a weak graphics-chip, such as the one provided on the computer named ‘Klexel’ using ‘i915 Support’, trying to run Compiz on it forces the so-called GPU to jump through too many hoops, to display what it’s being asked to display.

Before a certain point in time, even a hardware-accelerated graphics chip, only consisted of X vertex pipelines and Y fragment pipelines, and had other strict limitations on what it could do. It was after a point in time, that the “Unified Shader Model” was introduced, whereby any GPU core could act, as a vertex shader core, as a fragment shader core, etc.. And after that point in time, the GPU also became capable of rendering its output to texture images, several stages deep… Well, programmers today tend to program for the eventuality, that the host machine has ‘a real GPU’, with Unified Shader Model and unlimited cores, as well as unlimited texture space.

The “HP Compaq DC7100 SFF”, that has become my computer ‘Klexel’, is an ancient computer whose graphics chip stems from ‘the old days’. That seems to have been an Intel 910, which has as hardware-capability, direct-rendering with OpenGL 1.4 , the Open-Source equivalent of DirectX 7 or 8 . Even though some Compiz effects only require OpenGL 1.4 , by default, I need to run the computer named ‘Klexel’ without compositing:

screenshot-from-2018-09-04-11-56-50

Also, before, when this was the computer ‘Walnut’, it actually still had KDE 3 on it! KDE 3 was essentially also, without compositing.

It should finally be stable again, now.

By comparison, the computer which acts as Web-server and hosts this blog, which I name ‘Phoenix’, has as graphics chip an Nvidia “GeForce 6150SE”, that is more powerful than the Intel ‘i915′ series was, is capable of OpenGL 2.1 , equivalent to DirectX 9 , but still predated the Unified Shader Model chips. Microsoft has even dropped support for this graphics chip, because according to Microsoft, it’s also not powerful enough anymore. And so up-to-date Windows versions won’t run on either of these two computers.

(Update 09/04/2018, 18h20 : )

Continue reading I no longer have Compiz-Fusion running on the LXDE-based computer, named ‘Klexel’.

Some Bugs of my LXDE-based Computer, ‘Klexel’

I wrote only yesterday, that I had set up a computer with the Linux desktop-manager ‘LXDE’, and that I had named that computer ‘Klexel’.

Well I’m finding out that this computer has a bug. If I leave it with its screen-locker locked for some time, and then unlock with my password, the unlock dialog seems to succeed, but only reveals a black desktop, with only the mouse-pointer visible.

I suspect that I know what causes this. The computer in question has an old ‘Intel 910′ graphics chip-set, and although it may be good the the chip-set is supported, that chip-set and its drivers have quirks. I do have OpenGL 1.4, which should be high enough a version. But it may be that ‘behind the screen-locker’, by the time I’ve unlocked the machine again, the ‘Compiz Fusion’ desktop compositor has crashed.

There are certain other quirks which point to a graphics chip problem:

  • The window title-bars sometimes don’t render, until I click in the region where the title-bar should be, in which case they reappear.
  • Wobbly Windows needs to be enabled, in order for me to be able to restore the title-bars in this simple way.

I found that a practical way to deal with this not-resuming from the screen-locker, may be, by setting the key-sequence <Ctrl>+<Alt>+<Backspace> just to kill the X-server, as it would do under KDE or Plasma 5, using the following customization. I can right-click on the Keyboard Layout Tray Icon, then left-click on “Keyboard Layout Handler Settings”, and then:

screenshot-from-2018-09-02-06-21-12_c

I have set 2 ‘setxkbmap Options':

  1. The Compose Key,
  2. The X-server kill key.

Killing the X- just prompts me for a log-in again.

Note:

There is some possibility that the Compiz crash, on resuming from a plain lock-screen, may have to do with the Compiz setting, to display a Splash Image. By default, Kanotix systems come with an animated Kanotix splash-screen, that may look nice on systems with stable graphics, and for the first few times the system is explored. We can change this splash-screen to something other than the Kanotix splash-screen.

But I have noticed that, just for Compiz to start the splash-screen, causes instability with the Intel 910 chip-set, even if it does work. So what may be happening, is that on resuming from the lock-screen, Compiz may be programmed to display the splash-screen, and doing so may be what crashes my session. And so for now, I’ve also disabled this feature, and will comment later, on whether having done so has fixed the crashes.

(Update 09/05/2018, 15h30 … )

(As of 09/02/2018 : )

Continue reading Some Bugs of my LXDE-based Computer, ‘Klexel’

“Weather Widget” for Plasma 5 -based, Linux Computers

One of the observations which I’ve made about the practical use of Linux, is that in recent years and weeks, the number of weather widgets which we can use to decorate our desktops, and which provide some semblance of forecasting, has become more meager.

I suppose that one important reason may be the fact, that companies cannot extract revenues from operating servers, which simply respond to URL-requests, and which hand out weather information on that basis, for the client software to process as client wishes. Companies will only make profits these days, if they can force their clients to view advertisements.

And so recently I installed a widget, to my Debian / Stretch, Plasma 5 -based desktop computer named ‘Plato’, which is named ‘Weather Widget’, and which has the following display available:

screenshot_20180831_105340

This widget has as option to display information from ‘openweathermap.org‘, which has as intention to remain open and available.

There was a detail in how to get this widget running, that wasted some of my time yesterday, for which reason I’d like to share my experience with the reader. First of all, the preferred way to install this widget is, to right-click on the desktop, and then to left-click on “Add Widgets…”. If the desktop widgets are locked, the command must be given to unlock them first. Then, in the side-bar that appears, we click on “Get new Widgets” (at the very bottom), and then on “Download New Plasma Widgets”. In the window that appears, there’s a search field. In it, type ‘Weather’, and the widget in question should appear as available.

One great plus to adding widgets in this way, is the fact that we can do so, in user space, that is, without requiring root. However, here comes the catch: This widget will only display correctly, under Debian / Stretch, if the following two packages are installed:

  • ‘qml-module-qtgraphicaleffects’
  • ‘qml-module-qtquick-xmllistmodel’

Under other Plasma 5 -capable distributions, the same features may be provided by packages, which are named slightly differently.

Continue reading “Weather Widget” for Plasma 5 -based, Linux Computers

Simultaneous Update on Debian / Stretch Seems To Fix Wayland Bug, But An Effect Breaks.

This morning was one, on which most of my computers are receiving major system updates.

On the computer that acts as my Web-server, which I name ‘Phoenix’, this updated my Debian / Jessie version from 8.9 to 8.10.

On the computer which I most-recently installed, which I name ‘Plato’, this updated my Debian / Stretch version from 9.2 to 9.3 .

On both computers, this included a kernel-update. Additionally, it included an update, to the client-side X-server libraries. This posting has to do with the computer named ‘Plato’, which has kernel version ‘4.9.0-4-amd64′ now.

Previously I had blogged, that the computer named ‘Plato’ was suffering from a mysterious bug in its ‘Wayland’ compositor. If the compositing became suspended for any reason, after resuming, black rectangles would appear on the screen, as newly-opened windows faded in and out. This used to happen regardless of whether OpenGL 2 or OpenGL 3 compositing was being used.

Well since the update today, I tested the key-combination <Shift>+<Alt>+F12 again, which does the equivalent of sending the command to the compositor, to suspend. Apparently, the behavior of this key-combination has been changed since Debian / Jessie, so that instead of toggling, the compositing suspends for several seconds, and then automatically resumes. This would be useless as a user-feature, but can help with testing, because presumably, what an OpenGL application is supposed to do, is resend the signal every second or so, to make sure that compositing stays off.

To my pleasant surprise, I found that after compositing resumes, I no longer get black rectangles on the screen! :-)

Continue reading Simultaneous Update on Debian / Stretch Seems To Fix Wayland Bug, But An Effect Breaks.