NG-SPICE: Biasing the Default Transistor for Ideal Linear Voltage Gain, at 3V.

In recent days and weeks, I’ve been studying some of my own ideas, concerning the creative uses of the N-Channel, Enhancement-Mode, MOSFET. And to help me explore that subject, I’ve used An Open-Source Circuit Simulation Program called ‘NG-SPICE’. One big problem with this approach is the fact that the default transistor that the software assumes the power-user wants to use, is clearly not meant for Linear Voltage Amplification in the 100kHz-1.0Mhz frequency range, and with a 3V supply voltage. This transistor type is meant to be operated at higher voltages, and mainly, for digital uses. All the software is geared for Integrated Circuit Emphasis. But, I have looked at possible ways in which the default transistor could still be used under the conditions I’m more interested in. In theory, I could change the parameters of the transistor involved as much as I like, until I’ve made a high-speed, low-voltage transistor out of it. One problem with that is the fact that I give the software the geometry of the transistor on a chip, and the software then derives many of its assumed properties. I don’t know much about IC design, so I probably would not obtain the kind of transistor I’m looking for, if I tried to invent one.

So the question comes back, what is the best way to bias this one, arbitrary transistor-type, to act as a high-impedance amplifier under the conditions written above? And how much gain does it give me? The answer seems to be, that when connected as below, the best performance I can obtain is an Alpha of (-5.25):

Default_NM_Gain_IF_1

What I’ve also learned is, that the bias voltage associated with this circuit, with respect to ground, is (+2.14V). With respect to the supply voltage, that is (-0.86V). 3.75μV of bias current would need to flow. This information would be useful if an attempt ever came along to implement This Idea.

(Edit 7/5/2019, 17h15 : )

Doubling (VGS – VT0) of M1 would have as effect, that IDS quadruples. It would also have as effect, that equal, small changes in Gate Voltage translate into doubled changes in IDS. But, if the increase in bias current was taken into account by the circuit designer, by putting a resistor of merely 100kΩ in series with M1, thereby achieving that the supply voltage was ideally halved again as a result, then this would finally have as effect to halve the net voltage gain at the Drain of M1.

It would also have as effect, to quarter output impedance, which would be desirable from the last of a series of these stages, ending in a realistic load of some kind.

(End of Edit, 7/5/2019, 17h15.)

The Model-Card of the transistor is linked below:

http://dirkmittler.homeip.net/text/NMOS1.mod.txt

To pursue the exact subject of the earlier posting, about Variable-Gain Amplifiers, I also felt that it would be necessary to add to the circuit the components, that would transform it into a variable attenuator. And the following schematic shows how I did that:

(Updated 7/6/2019, 15h10 … )

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