On to the Future of 3D Web Content: Blend4Web

One of the subjects in Computing which continue to fascinate me, is CGI and so-called 3D Models as well as Scenes, that can be rendered to a 2D perspective View. At the same time, for the more trendy readers who like VR Goggles, those scenes can be rendered to 2 2D Views, just so that there will be parallax between them, and the scene seen with stereoscopic vision.

One of the facts which has been made known is that, sometime in 2020, Adobe plans to retire Flash. On one of my home pages, I actually have a 3D animation which used to run under Flash 11, when compiled with Stage3D support. What I find is that the latest Flash Firefox plugin will not display it for Linux, but Google Chrome still plays it. It’s an animation that should be fixed, but, since I neither have the software anymore which I once used to author it, nor the ability to expect browsers to support Flash in the future, I have just skipped fixing that animation.

What I may do at some point in the future, however, is to create some other sort of 3D content, that can be published as part of Web-pages. And, through the use of HTML5 and WebGL, this is quite feasible. The only question which struck me next was, What sort of platform could I use, eventually, that is Free and Open-Source? And the answer that presents itself, is Blend4Web – Community Edition!

Because this platform, which I’ve tested partially, is fully open-source, the licensing requires that I publish any and all source code used to create my future content, including source code belonging to Blend4Web-CE itself. Thus, to avoid procrastinating on that front, I have made the Open-Source version of that code available Here.

This way, whenever I want to create some 3D content, I will not need to worry much about the licensing requirement. Yet, if my readers want to, they may go to the company’s Web-site, linked to above, and purchase the paid-for version of the software instead, differently from the Open-Source version, which I really prefer and use. (:1)

I want to caution my readers however. This software tree comprises 1.4GB, and if the readers wish to download it, I’d strongly urge them to do so from the company’s Web-site, not mine, because the company has a Content Delivery Network – a CDN – that will enable many downloads, while I do not.

Note: Differently from what some readers have already inferred, Yes, the company Web-site also offers free downloads, of the Open-Source version, which is referred to as the ‘Community Edition’.

(Updated 01/05/2020, 11h40 … )

Continue reading On to the Future of 3D Web Content: Blend4Web

The failings of low-end consumer software, to typeset Math as (HTML) MathML.

One of the features which HTML5 has, and which many Web-browsers support, is the ability to typeset Mathematical formulae, which is known as ‘MathML’. Actually, MathML is an extension of XML, which also happens to be supported when inserted into HTML.

The “WiKiPedia” uses some such solution, partially because they need their formulae to look as sharp as possible at any resolution, but also, because they’d only have so much capacity, to store many, many image-files. In fact, the WiKiPedia uses a number of lossless techniques, to store sharp images as well as formulae. ( :1 )

But from a personal perspective, I’d appreciate a GUI, which allows me to export MathML. It’s fine to learn the syntax and code the HTML by hand, but in my life, the number of syntax-variations I’d need to invest to learn, would be almost as great, as the total number of software-packages I have installed, since each software-package, potentially uses yet-another syntax.

What I find however, is that if our software is open-source, very little of it will actually export to MathML. It would be very nice if we could get our Linux-based LaTeX engines, to export to this format, in a way that specifically preserves Math well. But what I find is, even though I posses a powerful GUI to help me manage various LaTeX renderings, that GUI being named “Kile”, that GUI relies back on a simple command-line tool named ‘latex2html’. Whatever that command-line outputs, that’s what all of Kile will output, if we tell it to render LaTeX specifically to HTML. ‘latex2html’ in turn, depends on ‘netpbm’, which counts as very old, legacy software.

One reason ‘latex2html’ will fail us, is the fact that in general, its intent is to render LaTeX, but not Math in any specific way. And so, just to posses the .TEX Files, will not guarantee a Linux user, that his resulting HTML will be stellar. ‘latex2html’ will generally output PNG Images, and will embed those images in the HTML File, on the premise that aside from the rasterization, PNG Format is lossless. Further, if the LaTeX code was generated by “wxMaxima”, using its ‘pdfLaTeX’ export format, we end up with incorrectly-aligned syntax, just because that dialect of LaTeX has been optimized by wxMaxima, for use in generating .PDF Files next.

(Updated 05/27/2018 : )

Continue reading The failings of low-end consumer software, to typeset Math as (HTML) MathML.