A New Set Of Headphones

As early as This posting, I had experimented with Bluetooth Headphones, that were specifically designed to handle High-Fidelity sound, for continuous music playback. But the fact is, that in the past 2 years, 3 such headphones failed me. The most-recent, ‘Infinim HBS-910′ set also failed on me, mechanically, only earlier this month, which effectively means that in total, if I continued doing things this way, I’d continue to burn through my money too fast.

So the course which I’ve chosen to go instead, is to use wired headphones, but to buy slightly-higher-quality, wired headphones, that are compatible with an Android device.

There once existed the observation, that the buttons on certain headphones would only work with iOS devices, and the buttons on other headphones would only work on Android-based devices. Interestingly enough, If the packaging doesn’t specify, then today, most headphones will work on either devices. My new Headrush HRB 3012 set has buttons which my Samsung Galaxy S6 recognizes.

(Edit 07/14/2018 : )

About these new ‘Headrush HRB 3012′ headphones:

Their cord consists of a ribbon, instead of the older-type, standard elastic, round-cross-section cords, which I was used to. I think that the current, ribbon design is a clever way to minimize any injuries which a headphone-cord can sustain, let’s say because users often pull the headphones out of their socket, by the cord instead of by the jack. The only way I foresee the ribbon-design getting injured, would be if somebody got a knot into it – and was then foolish enough to try to undo the knot, by just pulling it tight. And, because the ribbon tends to be more stiff, undoing knots correctly, has actually become easier.

There is one little issue with these though. Like the designs that I was used to, this set of headphones has a bump in its ribbon, which splits into two ribbons: One to the left ear, and one to the right ear. And in the segment of ribbon to the right ear, there is a remote-controller-button, inline-mike bump. When all the ribbons are (untwisted) parallel, and at right-angles to the wearer, the ribbon that goes to the right ear, has its mike facing away from the wearer, and has the controller-buttons facing towards the wearer.

As a result, I find myself twisting or rotating the right-hand ear-phone 360⁰ at the end of its ribbon-segment, thereby turning the inline-bump 180⁰, so that the inline-mike is again, facing towards me.

Dirk

 

I am also satisfied, with the Tone And Talk app.

Together with my new LG Tone Pro HBS-750 Bluetooth Headphones, there is a recommended app on Google Play, named “Tone & Talk”. It is not strictly necessary to use this app, when using the headphones, but it provides an advantage. This app will only activate, if it detects that one of the LG Headphones is BT- connected, that the app has on its supported devices list. The HBS-750 Headphones are on that list, and work in my case.

What this app does today, is somewhat different from what earlier versions of it used to do. The name of the original app was “LG BT Reader”, but when people download BT Reader, the latest version of it only tells them, that their membership has been migrated to the Tone & Talk app, which we should now install instead. There is a subtle difference in what these apps did.

LG BT Reader, had app-specific support, which enabled it not only to read out the text of notifications, but which also allowed it to read out the body of Facebook, Twitter, SMS and certain other messaging apps. Some users were interested in that, because people today do a lot of social networking – on their computers and phones.

In order to be able to do this, LG BT Reader needed to be enabled as an ‘Accessibility Aid’, which gave the app the ability, effectively, to observe how we tap, and then to tap in our place, on buttons within each app.

Tone & Talk has a slightly different approach. It supports a wider variety of apps, but only reads out the text part of notifications displayed by those apps. Just as with LG BT Reader, the user gets to enable specific apps which we want served. But with Tone & Talk, the list of supported apps is longer. As a trade-off, Tone & Talk will no longer go into each app, and read the screen of each app to us, which the earlier app used to do, to convey the body of the SMS or the Twitter announcement… Therefore, at least with Android Lollipop, Tone & Talk also no longer requires to be enabled as an Accessibility Aid, but only to have permission, to ‘Read Notifications’, as can be granted from the settings panel of our phone.

I had set up Tone & Talk as an Accessibility Aid, before launching it, and once it had detected the connection to my headset, it politely told me to unset this. It no longer needed this.

Now, there are some users who are upset about this change, because while they do a lot of SNS reading, they can no longer get the full messages of their Social Networking (Service) apps.

I, personally, am not even used to getting a lot of SMS messages, or other types of IM messages, and so the fact that Tone & Talk will not read those out, is no loss to me. I do receive a lot of email, to the 3rd-party app “Kaiten Mail”, and have this app enabled in Tone & Talk. What this means, is that Tone & Talk does factually read the subject line of any emails I receive, but not their body, and the former, only because the Kaiten Mail app makes the subject-line of received emails, a part of the notification text it displays.

I can actually appreciate that every time I receive a regular email, Tone & Talk will only announce the subject line to me, and that it will not attempt to read out the text of the entire email. I have Kaiten Mail set, to receive all the regular emails which I would also receive to my PCs and laptop.

Also, with the new app, I can set sundry other apps, so that Tone & Talk will read the notifications of each one. I already know which of my apps send me notifications which I am interested in receiving, possibly without taking the phone out of my shirt pocket, so that I can make this selection pretty much according to my taste.

What this means, is that some users have an understandable disappointment in the ‘Tone & Talk’ app, and have also not been given the option, to stay with the ‘LG BT Reader’ app. But I, for one, am not among the disappointed users, because I was never intending to use my headphones, the way those users were doing.

Dirk

Note: There is one app, which the Tone & Talk app has specific support for, and that is the Phone app. These headphones, and / or their software, have a complex system in place, such that if we receive a phone call – which was the primary purpose in having BT Headphones not long ago – and if the caller-ID of the person phoning us was in our Contacts List, the headphones will play the name of the person who is trying to call us.

Well, because the Phone app is also an app, it appears in the long list of them, which we can check off, to have notifications read to us. To check off the Phone app here constitutes an error. It might lead, to a primitive series of digits being read to us, that the Phone app displays as part of its notification text, while the more-specialized software is also trying to read the name of the caller to us.

I have discovered that If I do check the Phone app, as one of those, from which I am to receive regular notifications, the Tone & Talk app recognizes this as an error, and un-checks the other app again.