My Samsung Galaxy S6 Phone is behaving better between Reboots now.

One of the facts which I had reported to personal friends in recent months, was that I needed to reboot my phone frequently. This led to some puzzlement, because many owners of computers and smart-phones, and tablets, realize that in general, each of these device-categories should be able to run for extended periods of time. Back then, I was rebooting my phone, almost every week.

What I now find, is that I do not need to reboot it as often as I used to, and the reason for this is somewhat obscured, in that I also never really stated, why I needed to reboot it before.

One app I use a lot, is ““. The behavior of this app in the past was, that after having played songs several hundred times, it would just refuse to keep doing so, and would cut out on me, until I did my reboot. My instinctive response to this was to assume, that Android could easily be prone to memory leaks.

But what I seem to have learned, is that some update to this exact app in the past few months, completely fixed this behavior. So this was actually just due to a bug in one app.

The fact has been recorded, that by now I am using Bluetooth Headphones to listen to my walking-around music, instead of cheap ones that just plugged in to the headphone jack. But I also recall, that immediately after making the switch in headphones, this behavior of no longer playing music, did not stop. This behavior continued even after I had switched to the BT Headphones.

But in a related way, I once had a reason to reboot which was not fully related: Power consumption would increase, and grow intolerable. My explanation for this remains, that I have hundreds of apps installed, many of which run in the background, but after a reboot, some of the triggers are not set, that will cause these to do so. Only after several days of normal use, do programs run, which would like for the device to wake up later, so that the same program can run in the background. And so the power consumption will plateau at some level, which I was finding bothersome.

Well it is not likely, that the overall model would have changed, by which Android schedules programs to run in the background. Yet, now that I am walking around with my Bluetooth Headphones, I find that the power consumption is tolerable as well, in spite of not having rebooted for several weeks.

The only explanation I can think of for this second improvement, is that the 16-Ω headphones I was using before, must have been requiring a high drain on the battery in the phone, just to drive the headphones themselves.

OTOH, When I am using my BT Headphones to listen to music constantly, their drivers are being powered by a separate battery, belonging to the headphones themselves. Hence, the actual phone seems to be spared some amount of power drain.

Obviously, my BT Headphones are using Bluetooth 4, which consumes much less power than BT 2 did. But I had not imagined that the improvements would be as dramatic as they have become.

Dirk

Please Note: I would not recommend that people buy Bluetooth Headphones, specifically to listen to music, unless the readers have also assured themselves that their new headphones also use A Suitable CODEC, which allows them to appreciate the music in High Fidelity. Standard BT Heaphones are designed for making phone calls and little else.

(Edit 09/02/2016 : ) I should also add, that before making the switch to my Bluetooth Headphones, I typically had the Bluetooth feature of my phone turned on anyway, to enable it to access my “Vivofit” tracking bracelet. Thus, adding the headphones did not add the need for more chips to be turned on than already were, and both the Vivofit bracelet and my BT Headphones, use Bluetooth 4.

 

The HBS-750 Headphones Have Wider Ear-Pieces.

Even though for the most part, I try to avoid rating commercial products, there have been a few exceptions. One of those is the “LG Tone Pro HBS-750, Bluetooth Headphones” I have bought, and which I have been using every day, more to listen to music while on the go, than for phoning.

I think that one of the main disadvantages to this blogging engine, When We Select The Tag Named HBS-750 in the sidebar, is that the postings are listed in the reverse order from how they were posted, by me.

I am very satisfied with these headphones. Yet I do have a word of warning. When LG designed the actual ear-pieces, they equipped those with relatively wide sound-ports, ‘To let as much sound pass through as physically possible’. I happen to have relatively narrow ear-canals. These headphones do come with three sets of rubbers in total, to help users adapt them to differently-sized ears.

Because of the wider air-canals, the smallest rubbers on these are not quite as narrow, as the narrowest rubbers are on other headphones, that come with changeable rubbers.

Hence, even with the narrowest rubbers, these have a tad of trouble staying in my ears. Further, when I actually speak with these in my ears, there is a typical exaggeration in how I hear my own voice in my head, an exaggeration that is not equal on both ears. Therefore, How can I expect the bass-reproduction to be equal, coming from the headphones?

These fit slightly better in my right ear, always, than in my left ear.

Also, since the LG Engineers decided that these ear-pieces need to be wider, in order to let more sound through. I have narrower ear-canals than average: There is nothing magical about my Human ear-canals. They still cannot physically do, what cannot be done. And so it may also be true, that I cannot hear High-Fidelity Sound as well as I should, simply because of my narrow ear-canals.

Yet, I certainly hear the sound of my smart-phone better with these BT headphones, than I did with the wired ones, which plugged right in. And which happened to have a narrowest set of rubbers, which were narrower than these.

Dirk

 

How Low-Latency CODECs can have a Time-Delay on PCs and Mobile Devices.

aptX is a CODEC, which uses two stages of “Linear Filters”, which are also known as “Convolutions”. And aptX gets used by some of the Bluetooth Headphones, that have it as a special feature, to be able to play HiFi music.

If we could just assume for the moment that each of the filters used by aptX is a 6-tap filter, meaning a filter with 6 coefficients, which is a realistic assumption, it would seem that ‘low latency’ is implied.

aptX subdivides the uncompressed spectrum into 4 sub-bands, about 5 kHz wide each, and each of which has been converted into a parallel 11.025 kHz stream of samples, for further processing. At first glance, one would assume that the latency of such a filter is the amount of time it takes, for an input sample of sound to make it past 6 coefficients then. This would mean that the latency of one filter stage is less than 1 millisecond. And so the next question which a casual observer might ask would be, ‘Why then, is there a noticeable time-delay when I listen to my Bluetooth Media?’

In this case, this time-delay has nothing to do with the Wavelets used, or the low-pass and band-pass filters themselves. When we listen to a stream on a PC, a Laptop, or a consumer Mobile Device such as a smart-phone, there are stages involved, which most users do not see, and which have nothing to do with these individual 6-tap filters.

aptX is actually implemented on the hardware side, within the Bluetooth chip-set of the source of the stream. It does not even rely on the CPU for the processing.

But what happens to any audio streamed on a consumer PC / Laptop / Mobile Device, is that first a user-space application needs to transfer the audio into kernel space, that next a kernel module needs to transfer the stream, essentially, to the hardware interface, and that then, firmware for the chip-set allows the latter to compress the stream on its way out via the Bluetooth antenna.

In consumer computing, every time an audio stream needs to be transferred from one process to another, there is a buffer that stores a minimum interval of sound. And the number of buffered samples can be higher than what we imagine, because software specialists try to make up for possible multi-tasking here, that could cause the stream to skip or drop, because the actual CPU has been called to do some background processing, outside of playing back the audio stream. Such a condition is called a “Buffer Underflow” when it happens. So the delay of each of these buffers is commonly kept high, so that all the audio we are hearing, has been delayed as a unit, and so that the CPU can still perform additional tasks, without necessarily causing the audio to skip.

Such buffering does not just happen once, in consumer electronics, but several times.

The situation is different, when aptX is built-in to professional equipment, that gets used in concerts etc.. Here, the chips are not embedded in all-purpose computing devices, but rather into dedicated devices. And here, the buffering has essentially been eliminated, so that the technology can be used live.

Dirk