ChromeOS Upgrade from Debian 9 to Debian 10 – aka Buster – Google Script crashed.

I have one of those Chromebooks, which allow a Linux subsystem to be installed, that subsystem being referred to in the Google world as “Crostini”. It takes the form of a Virtual Machine, which mounts a Container. That container provides the logical hard drive of the VM’s Guest System. What Google had done at some point in the past was, to install Debian 9 / Stretch as the Linux version, in a simplified, automated way. But, because Debian Stretch is being replaced by Debian 10 / Buster, the option also exists, to upgrade the Linux Guest System to Buster. Only, while the option to do so manually was always available to knowledgeable users, with the recent Update of ChromeOS, Google insists that the user perform the upgrade, and provides ‘an easy script’ to do so. The user is prompted to click on something in his ChromeOS settings panel.

What happened to me, and what may also happen to my readers is, that this script crashes, and leaves the user with a ChromeOS window, that has a big red symbol displayed, to indicate that the upgrade failed. I failed to take a screen-shot of what this looks like. The button to offer the upgrade again, is thankfully taken away at that point. But, if he or she reaches that point, the user will need to decide what to do next, out of essentially two options:

  • Delete the Linux Container, and set up a new one from scratch. In that case, everything that was installed to, or stored within Linux will be lost. Or,
  • Try to complete the upgrade in spite of the failed script.

I chose to do the latter. The Linux O/S has its own method of performing such an upgrade. I would estimate that the reason for which the script crashed on me, might have been Google’s Expectation that my Linux Guest System might have 200-300 packages installed, when in fact I have a much more complete Linux system, with over 1000 packages installed, including services and other packages that ask for configuration options. At some point, the Google Script hangs, because the Linux O/S is asking an unexpected question. Also, while the easy button has a check-mark checked by default, to back up the Guest System’s files before performing the upgrade, I intentionally unchecked that, simply over the knowledge that I do not have sufficient storage on the Chromebook, to back up the Guest System.

I proceeded on the assumption, that what the Google script did first was, to change the contents of the file ‘/etc/apt/sources.list’, as well as of the directory ‘/etc/apt/sources.list.d’, to specify the new software sources, associated with Debian Buster as opposed to Debian Stretch. At that point, the Google script should also have set up, whatever it is that makes Crostini different from stock Linux. Only, once in the middle of the upgrade that follows, the Google script hanged.

(Updated 10/25/2020, 22h55… )

Continue reading ChromeOS Upgrade from Debian 9 to Debian 10 – aka Buster – Google Script crashed.

Pursuing the question of, whether a Linux subsystem, that runs under Android, due to the UserLAnd app, can be used for Web development.

It was a subject which I wrote about several months, or years ago, that I had installed the “UserLAnd” app on my Google Pixel C Tablet, so that I could install Debian Linux on it. And a question which one reader had asked me was, whether such an arrangement could be used, to carry out Web development. In fact, some question existed, as to whether proprietary software could be made to run, and my answer was, that it would be preferred to run only Free, Open-Source Software.

In the meantime, I’ve uninstalled Linux from the Pixel C, and installed it on my Samsung Galaxy Tab S6, which has 256GB of internal storage, so that this question can be examined more seriously.

The answer I’d give to this question is, that Web-development can be done in this way, as long as the developer accepts some severe restrictions.

  • Successful development of any kind will depend on whether the user has a real keyboard to type on.
  • The Open-Source application “Bluefish” runs out-of-the box, which is more than I can say for any sort of Python IDE.
  • Because there is little possibility to run a Web-server on the tablet, the features which Bluefish would normally have, to edit PHP Scripts as well, will simply need to be ignored. The ability to preview the Web-pages written, depends on the Guest System’s Firefox browser following the ‘prooted’ Guest System’s Filename-Paths, so that, when Bluefish opens Firefox, the HTML File will essentially be opened as if from the hard drive. And the feature works…

 

Screenshot_20200924-052525_VNC Viewer

Screenshot_20200924-052618_VNC Viewer

 

The main reason I would say, not to invest in paid-for software on this platform, is, because its full potential will not be realized.

The HTML and CSS Files created in this way will next need to be transferred to an actual Web-server, and some of the ways in which Bluefish would be set up on a real Linux box, would make this easier.

 

(Updated 10/03/2020, 4h00: )

Continue reading Pursuing the question of, whether a Linux subsystem, that runs under Android, due to the UserLAnd app, can be used for Web development.