A little trick needed, to get Blender to smooth-shade an object.

I was recently working on a project in Blender, which I have little experience doing, and noticing that, after my project was completed, the exported results showed flat-shading of mesh-approximations of spheres. And my intent was, to use mesh-approximations of spheres, but to have them smooth-shaded, such as, Phong-Shaded.

Because I was exporting the results to WebGL, my next suspicion was, that the WebGL platform was somehow handicapped, into always flat-shading the surfaces of its models. But a problem with this very suspicion was, that according to something I had already posted, to convert a model which is designed to be smooth-shaded, into a model which is flat-shaded, is not only bad practice in modelling, but also difficult to do. Hence, whatever WebGL malfunction might have been taking place, would also need to be accomplishing something computationally difficult.

As it turns out, when one wants an object to be smooth-shaded in Blender, there is an extra setting one needs to select, to make it so:

Screenshot_20200104_124756c

Once that setting has been clicked on for every object to be smooth-shaded, they will turn out to be so. Not only that, but the exported file-size actually got smaller, once I had done this for my 6 spheroids, than it was, when they were to be flat-shaded. And this last observation reassures me that:

  • Flat-Shading does in fact work as I had expected, and
  • WebGL is not handicapped out of smooth-shading.

 

It should be pointed out that, while Blender allows Materials to be given different methods of applying Normal Vectors, one of which is “Lambert Shading”, it will not offer the user different methods of interpolating the normal vector, between vertex-normals, because this interpolation, if there is to be one, is usually defined by an external program, or, in many cases, by the GPU, if hardware accelerated graphics is to be applied.

Dirk

 

On to the Future of 3D Web Content: Blend4Web

One of the subjects in Computing which continue to fascinate me, is CGI and so-called 3D Models as well as Scenes, that can be rendered to a 2D perspective View. At the same time, for the more trendy readers who like VR Goggles, those scenes can be rendered to 2 2D Views, just so that there will be parallax between them, and the scene seen with stereoscopic vision.

One of the facts which has been made known is that, sometime in 2020, Adobe plans to retire Flash. On one of my home pages, I actually have a 3D animation which used to run under Flash 11, when compiled with Stage3D support. What I find is that the latest Flash Firefox plugin will not display it for Linux, but Google Chrome still plays it. It’s an animation that should be fixed, but, since I neither have the software anymore which I once used to author it, nor the ability to expect browsers to support Flash in the future, I have just skipped fixing that animation.

What I may do at some point in the future, however, is to create some other sort of 3D content, that can be published as part of Web-pages. And, through the use of HTML5 and WebGL, this is quite feasible. The only question which struck me next was, What sort of platform could I use, eventually, that is Free and Open-Source? And the answer that presents itself, is Blend4Web – Community Edition!

Because this platform, which I’ve tested partially, is fully open-source, the licensing requires that I publish any and all source code used to create my future content, including source code belonging to Blend4Web-CE itself. Thus, to avoid procrastinating on that front, I have made the Open-Source version of that code available Here.

This way, whenever I want to create some 3D content, I will not need to worry much about the licensing requirement. Yet, if my readers want to, they may go to the company’s Web-site, linked to above, and purchase the paid-for version of the software instead, differently from the Open-Source version, which I really prefer and use. (:1)

I want to caution my readers however. This software tree comprises 1.4GB, and if the readers wish to download it, I’d strongly urge them to do so from the company’s Web-site, not mine, because the company has a Content Delivery Network – a CDN – that will enable many downloads, while I do not.

Note: Differently from what some readers have already inferred, Yes, the company Web-site also offers free downloads, of the Open-Source version, which is referred to as the ‘Community Edition’.

(Updated 01/05/2020, 11h40 … )

Continue reading On to the Future of 3D Web Content: Blend4Web

A fact about how software-rendering is managed in practice, today.

People of my generation – and I’m over 50 years old as I’m writing this – first learned about CGI – computer-simulated images – in the form of ‘ray-tracing’. What my contemporaries are slow to find out is that meanwhile, an important additional form of CGI has come into existence, which is referred to as ‘raster-based rendering’.

Ray-tracing has as advantage over raster-based rendering, better optical accuracy, which leads to photo-realism. Ray-tracing therefore still gets used a lot, especially in Hollywood-originated CGI for Movies, etc.. But ray-tracing still has a big drawback, which is, that it’s slow to compute. Typically, ray-tracing cannot be done in real-time, needs to be performed on a farm of computers, and typically, an hour of CPU-time may be needed, to render a sequence which might play for 10 seconds.

But, in order for consumers to be able to play 3D games, the CGI needs to be in real-time, for which reason the other type of rendering was invented in the 1990s, and this form of rendering is carried out by the graphics hardware, in real-time.

What this dichotomy has led to, is model- and scene-editors such as “Blender”, which allow complex editing of 3D content, often with the purpose that the content eventually be rendered by arbitrary, external methods, that include software-based, ray tracing. But such editing applications still themselves possess an Editing Preview window / rectangle, in which their power-users can see the technical details of what they’re editing, in real-time. And those editing preview windows are then hardware-rendered, using raster-based methods, instead of the final result being rendered using raster-based methods.

Continue reading A fact about how software-rendering is managed in practice, today.

OpenShot-Qt Now Cooperates With Wayland Compositing.

One of the subjects which I blogged about before was, that the Debian version of OpenShot at the time, would simply freeze with desktop compositing on. That was the default, GTK version of OpenShot. Further, I can’t vouch for OpenShot under Windows because I think that the way it installs itself is botched. Yet, I am always keen to have such non-linear, 2D video editing applications available.

Well in the present, I have an up-to-date version of OpenShot installed, which is explicitly the Qt-version, installed as the package ‘openshot-qt’ on a Debian / Stretch computer. The main reason fw I have this version working, is the fact that I subscribed the computer I name ‘Phosphene’ to the Debian Multimedia Repository. Without access to this repository, Linux users can sometimes be hosed. In other cases, having its libraries installed can break dependencies with other software.

But this latest Debian Repository version of OpenShot-Qt (2.3.4), for Debian / Stretch, impresses me. Actually, when we first install it, the run-time won’t run, because of a missing library, that being ‘urllib’. This is due to the application package failing to state a dependency. This dependency can be resolved by installing ‘python-requests’ and ‘python3-requests’, which I believe also pulls in ‘python-urllib3′ and ‘python3-urllib3′. After this has been installed, ‘OpenShot-Qt’ runs.

When the developers upgraded their main build of OpenShot to version 2 (+), they needed to rewrite the source code for all the effects of the editor. And for this reason, the up-to-date version only seems to have 7 actual effects, that run over the duration that they’re applied for:

Screenshot_20190224_201216

Such Effects can be applied to a clip, by dragging them onto the clip.

In contrast, because of the flexible way in which this editor defines Transitions – as grey-scale images, it still seems to have an almost unlimited supply of those, that transfer the foreground from one video clip to another (not shown).

But one way in which OpenShot makes up for its small library of 2D /time effects, is by giving its user a very powerful Title Editor, which actually invokes Blender, in order to create renderings of Titles with 3D effects:

(Updated 2/27/2019, 5h50 … )

Continue reading OpenShot-Qt Now Cooperates With Wayland Compositing.