I see Android 7.1.1 as a significant improvement over 5.x .

In Android 7.1 , Google seems to have taken an aggressive approach to rectifying this problem and this problem.

Not only do newer versions of Android give users control over granting each permission to an app that requests it, thus slowing down privilege escalation attacks that have been possible in the past. But Android 7.1 actually rolls back permissions, which have been granted in the past. When we upgrade, the apps are optimized in such a way that many of their permissions default to Not Granted, until an effort is made by the user to Grant Them.

Further, since version 6.0.1 , Android has a feature called Doze. What it seems to do is cancel alarms which apps had set, to wake themselves again in the background. It cuts down significantly on the battery consumption of a fully up-to-date Google Pixel C.

Unfortunately, this also interferes with how the email apps Kaiten and K-9 work, which try to poll the email servers at regular, user-configured intervals, but which eventually stall in their older way of doing so, instead displaying the message ‘Sync Disabled’. On my own Pixel C, I have had to whitelist the Kaiten app, to exclude it from Battery Optimization manually, so that now it is fetching emails from the server again.

Continue reading I see Android 7.1.1 as a significant improvement over 5.x .

Pixel C Keyboard Criticism seems Unwarranted.

The Google Pixel C Tablet is offered alongside a keyboard made specifically for it – That is a real, physical keyboard, as opposed to some virtual keyboard that just exists graphically on the screen. This added keyboard has its own battery, which recharges by induction coils from the tablet, when the two devices are placed together in an inactive, closed position.

There is an aspect to how this works, which some people have criticized often. If the tablet is attached magnetically to the KB in the upright position – i.e. both are in use – It is possible to leave the A/C / USB-C Adapter plugged in, so that prolonged use will not drain the battery in the tablet. What some users do not like about this, is that doing so does not also plug in the keyboard, which continues to run off its batteries, until the active use is discontinued, and until both parts are repositioned for charging. Some people would like, that the batteries in the KB are also guaranteed not to go low, because the adapter is plugged in to the A/C.

(Edit 04/11/2017 :

Whether I would agree that this problem is serious, depends on a question I do not know the answer to, which is: ‘Does the Pixel C continue to charge its keyboard, when not plugged in, but when the keyboard is in its closed, protected position?’ There are really 2 possibilities:

  1. The Pixel C could be supplying current to the coil that acts as a primary winding, albeit a reduced current, in a way that drains some charge from its internal battery, in order to charge the keyboard-battery slowly, and the capacity of the KB-battery could be so much smaller than that in the Pixel C, that the charge-level of the tablet does not seem to decrease much.
  2. The Pixel C may only be charging its keyboard-battery, when it is itself plugged in, and could be indicating that its own battery is fully charged, without the user having any indication of what the charge-level of the KB is. The user would be unplugging the tablet, not knowing whether his KB is fully charged as well.

If the answer is (1), then I do not see this problem as serious, because it would mean that the KB will generally be able to come back to full charge while the tablet is not being used, even while on-the-go, unless the tablet-battery dies first.

If the answer is (2), then the light-bar of the tablet is of no help, because that factually only indicates the charge of the tablet-battery, to the nearest 1/4 . )

 

(Edit 04/04/2017 : )

Continue reading Pixel C Keyboard Criticism seems Unwarranted.