The Sort Of Software that will Not Run, on my Linux Tablet

In this posting I wrote, that I had installed Linux in a chroot-environment, on my old Samsung Galaxy Tab S, First Generation tablet, which remains an Android-based tablet. I did this specifically using the apps from the Google play store, named ‘GNURoot’ and ‘XSDL’, which do not require root.

Here, I gave a compendium of Linux-applications which do run in the resulting Linux guest-system.

I think that I need to point out a broad category of Linux applications that will always remain poor choices:

  • Audio Editors,
  • Video Editors.

The problem with any Audio Editor, is that it will eventually need to input and output Audio – not just edit sound files – and any Video Editor, needs to give a preview of all its video-clips – not just edit video files. This seems like a silly thing to write, but is non-trivial in my present context.

I have taken a Linux engine – GNURoot – and connected it to an externally-supplied X-server emulation – XSDL. The pipeline between these two Android apps is very narrow. It consists of X-server protocol – which is excellent and rendering text and GUIs, of shared memory at its maximum, and of a PulseAudio server, visible on the Linux side as such, but collectively running on the Android side as an SDL client.

I have no way to provide OpenGL or SDL on the Linux-side. What this means, is that virtually any non-linear video editor will want to see both installed on the Linux side, while neither is provided.

Continue reading The Sort Of Software that will Not Run, on my Linux Tablet

K-9 Mail is the way to go!

In this earlier posting, I had started to document, how under Android, I had been using the email-client “Kaiten”, which years ago, when I had started using it, was a paid-for alternative to the program “K-9″, in return for which I had expected regular updates.

But as it happened, Kaiten has stopped receiving support, while K-9 continued to receive the updates.

One of the features sorely lacking in Kaiten, was PGP/MIME support. Kaiten was limited to signing or encrypting emails using Inline Signatures, while the modern way to go about it is using PGP/MIME. Also, I’ve been receiving emails, which have also progressed to being signed with PGP/MIME, which Kaiten could not interpret.

And so just this morning, I made the switch on some of my Android devices, to K-9, which has PGP/MIME Support.

When using K-9, one no longer uses the companion app ‘APG’, but rather the companion app “OpenKeyChain“, to perform the cryptography.

Because K-9 actually accepts the configuration files exported by Kaiten, the switch was easy to carry out.

Dirk