Finally getting my FB Messenger Notifications to be Quiet

One of the plans which I had told my contacts about, was that if they send me SMS messages – i.e. phone-texts – the understanding would be that my phone would shout at me, to implore me to answer at once – therefore, for them to use SMS in an emergency.

OTOH, It can happen that one of my friends might like to chat with me, but without causing me to become a distraction to people around me. My phone should notify me noticeably-to-me, but silently. For that purpose, I still recommend that people use Facebook Messenger.

For some time, it was working that way for me, but at some later time, this had stopped working, in that each time I received a FB Messenger Chat Head, my phone had started to give me an audible notification again, which I had some trouble suppressing, in spite of the improvements that Android 7 brought to my Phone!

However, since recent months, I’ve gotten FB Messenger notifications to behave again, exactly as I want them to. And here is how I fixed the problem:

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Why AirDroid holds promise for me, after all.

There exists a higher-quality solution to this need, known as ‘Samsung Side-Sync’. But a big problem in my own desire to use this Android app, is the fact that its client-program is only available for Mac or Windows – while I mainly tend to have Linux installed on my PCs and laptops.

The capability which the app delivers, is to turn the Android device into a type of remote, VNC Host, or Server, on which a client seeks to establish a session, in which the properties and resources of the host, are displayed on the client-computer, remotely, as if the user of the client was in fact sitting in front of the host.

This is not so strange an idea, as various types of VNC / RDP already exist, by which a remote session is created on a Windows or a Linux PC as host, such that the client – even if that client exists as an Android client – can seem to have a remote session.

Because I was intrigued by making the Android device the host for a change, and by the possibility of using a Web-interface as client, I decided to give an app a try, which is called AirDroid. After all, even Linux computers have Web-browsers which would be powerful enough to run as clients.

I installed the app on my up-to-date Google Pixel C Tablet, But was initially disappointed, in the apparent observation, that AirDroid just did not seem stable enough to trust with such an objective.

(Last Updated 08/09/2017 : )

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The Successful Use of ADB Drivers, to Enable Automation of Power-Saving, on my Samsung S6 Smart-Phone

I happen to be a long-time user of this app, which exports shortcuts to the Android system, which together with this app, allow for the automation of power-saving mode, by way of .

Until recently, this phone still had on it, which meant that the power-saving app was able to toggle power-saving mode without requiring special permissions. However, since my upgrade to on the phone (), this permission is no longer granted. And so I needed to grant access to the power-saving app, to restricted settings on the phone, via .

Today was the first time I ever used the on my Linux laptop named ‘‘.

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Google Pixel C does not have NEON.

I have been thoroughly enjoying my , which I ordered only recently, and which I ordered because the actual tablet I have been using before, was only a first-generation .

Sometimes we obtain many new features, but also at the expense of losing some feature. Because the CPU is a RISC-Chip, the manufacturers of Android devices have sometimes made up for this by including a coprocessor called . is an SIMD – a Single-Instruction, Multiple-Data – coprocessor – aka a Vector-Processor, which is often useful to allow the decoding of high-definition video streams in real-time, without placing the burden of doing so on the main CPU.

(Edit 04/08/2017 : I have given my own definition of what “Hardware Acceleration” means, Here. )

What has happened with the Pixel C, is that Google has decided to put a CPU into it, which is an SoC that also has a big coprocessor – its mighty GPU. With this tablet, real-time video-decoding is meant to be performed by the GPU, which advertizes several system-installed Codecs. Therefore, watching videos in high definition should not require a coprocessor, and the does not have one. (And, when I scroll further down the list of Codecs, that list includes two of the corresponding Encoders, from , not only the Decoders. )

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In fact, the only has a 4-core main CPU!

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