WordPress.org needs to be adapted to Debian.

I guess that when many people blog, they may go directly to a (paid) hosting service for blogs. WordPress.com would be an example of that. But the assumption that seems to come next, is that people have a Web-hosting service already, with the privileges to FTP files up to it, and privileges to run (server-side) CGI scripts written in PHP. One type of software which they can then upload to this service, can be WordPress.org.

Hence, a lot of the assumptions made in the packaging of WordPress.org, are relevant to this usage scenario, including perhaps the need that can come up to solve technical issues, by tolerating possible configuration changes on the part of the blogger.

What I’m doing is a bit more out of the ordinary, to host my site on my own server, including to host WordPress.org. The way this Web-application is set up by default, it has a root or base directory, plus a content directory that underlies the root. Because many people simply upload this package to their Web-host, and then tinker with it until it works, it’s not an urgent need as seen by the WordPress.org devs, to fend off the root directory as having a username different from the username of the content directory.

But in my setup that’s how it is. And so, entirely because I, too, was tinkering with my setup, I did trigger an attempted core update, which would have rewritten the contents of my root directory. But, because this site’s root has different permissions set on my computer, the WordPress version I use was also unable to give itself a complete update. This is a good thing, because mine was initially installed via my (Debian / Linux) package manager, and I need to keep it compatible with any future updates the package-manager might give it. OTOH, sub-directories of my content directory are supposed to contain more-personalized information.

My enforcement of this was such, that the WordPress.org Web-application was unable to put the site into “Maintenance Mode”, in order to do its core-update. But the fact remains, that even if the site wanted only to update plug-ins or the theme that I happen to be using, this Web-application would still need to put the site into maintenance mode first, which by default it can’t. So by default, even updates to plug-ins would fail.

But my past practice, of just deleting a plug-in from the content directory, and of copying the new version into that content directory – which might be called ‘a manual update’ – will no longer continue to serve me well. From now on, I’ll want to run my updates in-place. And this required some further modification – I.e. some more fiddling on my part, to prepare.

As it stands an attempted in-place update even just for a plug-in, will still fail harmlessly, unless I now do something specific with my root password first. And I’m not going to be more specific than that. I did post some questions on the WordPress.org forums about the issue that I ran in to before, but then just posted my own answer to this issue. It’s just that since nobody did reply to my questions within a few hours of my posting them – until I marked my own issue as Resolved – I also feel that I shouldn’t be wasting their time with more of my details. And without these details, they may not be confident that I really do understand this subject. It’s just that nobody over there even bothered to follow up on that thought, let’s say with any questions of their own.

Dirk

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

One thought on “WordPress.org needs to be adapted to Debian.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Please Prove You Are Not A Robot *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>