Scilab emphasizes, that the Linux world is rich with Technical / Scientific Computing platforms…

In my previous posting, I listed several (Open-Source) platforms for Computing, available under Linux at no cost, which have emphasis on Technical and Scientific applications. These platforms differ from conventional programming languages, in that conventional languages mainly specialize in allowing applications to be built, that perform a highly specialized function, while technically oriented platforms allow a user to define Math problems to be solved, to do so, and then to define a whole new Math problem to be solved…

My previous posting had also hinted that, when it comes to Computing tools of this kind, I prefer ‘the lean and mean approach’, in which the learning of specialized scripting languages would be kept to a minimum, but where, through his or her own resourcefulness, the User / Scientist knows how to apply Math, to solve their problem…

Yet, solutions do exist which go entirely in a different direction, and I’d say that “Scilab” is one of them. Under Debian Linux, one usually installs it as a collection of packages, from standard repositories, using the package manager.

Scilab is an application – and a workbench – with a rich GUI. It combines many features. But again, If somebody wanted to use it for real problem-solving, what would really count is, to learn its scripting language (which I have not done). Yet, Scilab typically comes with many Demos that tend to work reliably out-of-the-box, so that, even without knowing the scripting language, users can treat themselves to some amount of eye-candy, just by clicking on those….

 

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As I’ve stated repeatedly, sometimes I cannot gauge whether certain Scientific Computing platforms are really worth their Salt – especially since in this case, they won’t cost much more than a household quantity of salt does. ;-)  But, if the reader finds that he or she needs a powerful GUI, then maybe, Scilab would be the choice for them?

 

Dirk

 

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