There has been a Dist-Upgrade on my Server.

This server is hosted on a Debian / Jessie (Linux) computer which I own and run myself. Under Debian – Linux systems, the most thorough kind of update which can be carried out is called a ‘dist-upgrade’ or a ‘d-u’ for short. Just this evening, I saw that suddenly there were 93 software packages, which all did need an upgrade, and saw, that I could not just leave this type of upgrade to the usual, automated services. Therefore, I decided to administer the 93 package-upgrades given, via a dist-upgrade command. This can be stressful, or exciting, or both, because it can give a Linux user an improvement, or it can in some cases actually cripple our systems. I’m glad to say that this Linux box I name ‘Phoenix’ did not get crippled. It’s still fully bootable.

But due to this procedure, the Web-server was also down, from 20h15 through until 20h40 or so. I see that my blog is still here though, after the d-u .

I think that most software updates can be fun and games. But this particular upgrade also chose to include my graphics driver, which I was particularly fussy about. The past version of the graphics driver on this box was extremely stable, and I was trying to avoid doing any sort of upgrade to it, but now doing so was the only way to keep my box compatible with future upgrades.

It has sometimes happened to me, that the screen might just freeze – even though it’s a Linux computer – due to stability problems with other graphics drivers – especially with the ‘mesa’ driver, which tries to software-render an OpenGL equivalent. But what has been most stable for me in recent months, was the ‘GLX’ driver, which does full hardware, OpenGL rendering as it’s supposed to, and which under modern Linux systems is even capable of a ‘TDR’ equivalent, a Timeout Detection and Recovery, which will restart a crashed GPU without harming the active session.

If in the near future I find that my screen does freeze, or that there are TDR issues, a sinking feeling will go through my heart, because that would signal that a completely stable graphics driver has been replaced unnecessarily, with an unstable one. And in the act of doing so, all my package-management scripts even recompiled the DKMS kernel module for the graphics driver in question, because that is the correct way to install it.

Oh Yes, I see that the Apache Web-server software, which my machine hosts, has been given an upgrade as well. But as I see it, this was the least likely set of packages, for the maintainers to have botched. So it’s my full assumption that Web-server activity will continue without error.

Dirk

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

One thought on “There has been a Dist-Upgrade on my Server.”

  1. This upgrade was also particularly a cliffhanger, because it included the core libraries that all programs depend on, to run. Those are called the ‘libc’ libraries under GNU / Linux. Yet, because everybody understands that these libraries are key to the computer remaining operable, I can suppose that a lot of attention was also placed by the maintainers, on keeping those as error-free as humanly possible.
    Also, the ‘apt’ package-manager package was included, which would have been needed to install future, follow-on upgrades, let’s say to fix problems that keep ‘apt’ from working…
    OTOH, It seemed most probable that somebody might botch the graphics driver (which I’ve seen no sign of so far)…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Please Prove You Are Not A Robot *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>