On to the Future of 3D Web Content: Blend4Web

One of the subjects in Computing which continue to fascinate me, is CGI and so-called 3D Models as well as Scenes, that can be rendered to a 2D perspective View. At the same time, for the more trendy readers who like VR Goggles, those scenes can be rendered to 2 2D Views, just so that there will be parallax between them, and the scene seen with stereoscopic vision.

One of the facts which has been made known is that, sometime in 2020, Adobe plans to retire Flash. On one of my home pages, I actually have a 3D animation which used to run under Flash 11, when compiled with Stage3D support. What I find is that the latest Flash Firefox plugin will not display it for Linux, but Google Chrome still plays it. It’s an animation that should be fixed, but, since I neither have the software anymore which I once used to author it, nor the ability to expect browsers to support Flash in the future, I have just skipped fixing that animation.

What I may do at some point in the future, however, is to create some other sort of 3D content, that can be published as part of Web-pages. And, through the use of HTML5 and WebGL, this is quite feasible. The only question which struck me next was, What sort of platform could I use, eventually, that is Free and Open-Source? And the answer that presents itself, is Blend4Web – Community Edition!

Because this platform, which I’ve tested partially, is fully open-source, the licensing requires that I publish any and all source code used to create my future content, including source code belonging to Blend4Web-CE itself. Thus, to avoid procrastinating on that front, I have made the Open-Source version of that code available Here.

This way, whenever I want to create some 3D content, I will not need to worry much about the licensing requirement. Yet, if my readers want to, they may go to the company’s Web-site, linked to above, and purchase the paid-for version of the software instead, differently from the Open-Source version, which I really prefer and use. (:1)

I want to caution my readers however. This software tree comprises 1.4GB, and if the readers wish to download it, I’d strongly urge them to do so from the company’s Web-site, not mine, because the company has a Content Delivery Network – a CDN – that will enable many downloads, while I do not.

Note: Differently from what some readers have already inferred, Yes, the company Web-site also offers free downloads, of the Open-Source version, which is referred to as the ‘Community Edition’.

(Updated 01/05/2020, 11h40 … )

Continue reading On to the Future of 3D Web Content: Blend4Web

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One main reason, for which Smart Home Appliances are cloud-based.

Like many other consumers, I have some ‘smart appliances’ in my home, and a harmless example which I will use, is my Dyson Air Purifier. It gives me features (beyond) what I would have requested, but a feature which I do appreciate, is the ability to access its settings etc., from an app on my smart-phone, regardless of whether I’m connected to my own Wi-Fi, the way the appliance is, or whether I’m outside somewhere. And this is a feature which most smart appliances offer.

Screenshot_20191223-122814_Dyson Link_c

But a question which I could easily picture a consumer asking would be, ‘Why is it necessary for this device to log in to a cloud server, just so that I can access it? Why can this arrangement not work autonomously?’

And I can visualize all sorts of answers, which some consumers could come up with, that might include, ‘Because Big Brother Is Watching Us.’ I tend to be sensitive to certain privacy issues, but also know that in this case, this would not be the main answer. Is Big Brother really so curious about what the air quality is in our homes?

A big reason why these devices need to be logged in to a cloud server, has to do with that last part of what they offer: To give us access to the appliance and its controls, even when we are not on our own LAN (Local Area Network).

Continue reading One main reason, for which Smart Home Appliances are cloud-based.

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An Observation About Chrome OS

There is a list of criticisms I could make about Chrome OS, but which I will simply skip for the moment.

I recently bought a new Chromebook.

I have an important piece of information – and praise – about Chrome OS. Its version of the Chrome Web browser – which is simply referred to as ‘Chrome’ – is capable of doing everything that full, desktop Web browsers can do, including, to install extensions from the Chrome Web store. This differs obviously from what the Chrome browser under Android did, which was only a small fraction of that.

Because of this, it’s unnecessary to install numerous Android apps, that just used to be front-ends of sorts, for services that were already available from Web-sites. Four apps which I did not need to install because I was just able to point Chrome to the relevant site, bookmark each site, and log in, are:

  1. Skype
  2. Netflix
  3. Amazon Prime Video
  4. Cineplex Store

And I’m writing this, even though there exist reports that the Android Netflix app runs fine under Chrome OS.

I’m sure my list will grow.

Dirk

 

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Just performed a wanton reboot of my Modem/Router.

The modem/router which I use for my LAN is a Bell Hub 3000, which I still hold to be a good modem. But lately, I discovered a slight glitch in the way it works. I have given it numerous specialized settings, such as, for example, a “Reserved IP Address” for my new Chromebook.

The problem I ran in to was, that the modem was executing all my settings without the slightest flaw, but was failing to commit changes to certain settings to non-volatile memory. Apparently, the way the modem is organized internally is, that it has volatile as well as non-volatile memory, which mimic the RAM and the Storage of other, modern devices.

In certain cases, even a full-blown PC could be running some version of an operating system, in which a user-initiated change is accepted and enacted, but only saved to non-volatile storage, when the user logs out successfully.

Well, earlier this evening I had a power failure, after which the modem restarted, but restarted with settings, that predated the most recent settings which I had given it. This was its only offence.

Now, I could go through the ritual of changing all my special settings again, after every power failure, but in reality, that would not do. And so, what I did was to soft-boot the modem, which, just like that poorly programmed desktop manager would, saved all my settings to non-volatile memory. After the reboot, those settings have stuck.

But what it also means is twofold:

  1. This blog went down again, from 20h15 until 20h25, in other words, for an extra 10 minutes.
  2. And, if there are any readers who examine the IP address log in the side-bar of my blog, they will notice an additional IP address change, simply due to the modem reboot. This will be, between 20h10 and 21h10. This one was not due to any malfunction, but was deliberately triggered by my action.

The process was short but painful, and had to be done. :-)

Dirk

 

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