I have just had to get my hands dirty, with apt-listbugs.

According to This Posting, I have installed ‘unattended-upgrades‘ on the computer I name ‘Phoenix’, and I have also installed ‘apt-listbugs‘, as an insurance policy against ‘unattended-upgrades‘ auto-installing defective packages.

This has always posed the question of what will happen in practice, if ‘apt-listbugs‘ “pins” certain packages, thus having stopped them, but if the update-procedure needs to be reactivated later, manually. I have never had to act in this matter yet, while instead, there was one recorded occasion, on which upgrades did not take place on one day, but took place again a day later, automatically.

But just today I needed to override what ‘apt-listbugs‘ had done, manually. In particular, the question exists, of how one can get apt-listbugs to unpin an upgrade which was once scheduled, so that we can do the upgrade later, and so that we can see what apt-listbugs had to say about it.

By default, if we then simply type in ‘apt-get upgrade‘, nothing happens.

As it turns out, there is a single file named ‘/etc/apt/preferences.d/apt-listbugs‘, which we need to delete, before we can restart an upgrade process.

After I did this, my ‘apt-get upgrade‘ took place normally again, and I got to see what the error was, over which ‘apt-listbugs‘ had stopped the unattended upgrade today.

Dirk

 

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The Newest Dropbox version seems to follow Linux Power-Saving Behavior.

As of an earlier posting, I had “Dropbox” v3.16.1 running on my KDE-4 Linux desktop. This version has updated itself to v3.18.1 . Additionally, I have this Dropbox client installed and idling, on the Linux laptop I name ‘Klystron’.

I see one significant new behavior. When I have left my laptop idle, with the screen turning off, the little Dropbox icon changes to show that it has dropped its connection to the Dropbox server. This is similar to behavior which my “Pidgin” IRC client has shown, and seems to suggest, that there are power-saving measures in place on up-to-date Linux desktop managers, which certain applications may opt to use.

The ‘KDE’ desktop manager has in common with ‘GNOME’, that both now use ‘DBUS’ as their inter-process communication system. So what works under GNOME, will frequently also work under KDE when properly set up.

But the fact that both Pidgin and Dropbox seem to do this on my laptop, means that I do not have to keep looking as hard as before, for causes within the kernel module of my laptop WiFi, for possible connection issues. In both cases, the software seems to reconnect to its server, as soon as I have unlocked my screensaver.

Unlocking the screensaver is an event, which a kernel module usually does not recognize.

(Edit 04/17/2016 : ) One way in which such a power-saving mode would make sense however, is that the Kernel can recognize it, and can give the software command to the Kernel Module, to turn off its antenna as well. However, according to This Posting, I have forbidden the KM from following such a command, such that the antenna does not switch off.

Depending on what software we have installed, simply having the WiFi turn off, can cause problems.

Dirk

 

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I recently watched the movie “Edge Of Tomorrow”.

As the subject line suggests. I felt that this was a surprisingly good movie. I will not spoil the show, by giving away any of the plot details, but ended the evening extremely satisfied with having watched this.

I am not usually a fan of Tom Cruise, who stars in this movie, but found that not only the movie was good, but that even his acting was above-average.

I recommend the movie.

More than a hard-core Sci-Fi, this is actually a kind of action movie, which Tom Cruise is suited to star in. It just has its own, unique, Sci-Fi twist to it.

Dirk

 

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I do not own my own router.

One thing which exists in a big way in Canada, is that ISP subscribers own their own router. But as it happens, my router is owned by Bell and rented to me. The official reason for this, is the fact that my router also provides me with Bell Fibe TV, which contrarily to the naming, is in fact provided over IP via DSL twisted-pair wires.

This paid-for TV content is DRM, so that it is hard to imagine that any other computer enthusiasts have managed to set up their own router, and to receive Fibe TV anyway.

But this also means that I do not have the access to flash my own router. Bell can flash the router when they see a need, but I cannot. And this also means that I cannot obtain full control over this router.

Readers might think that this is an odd situation, for a person who sets up a Web-server, and an OpenVPN-server, at his home IP address. But by using IP-tables in my Linux configuration, I have been able to do precisely that. In particular, the OpenVPN-server requires an ‘IP Masquerade’ to work. But as of my last test, it does work.

But because I am a person who ‘sometimes thinks suspiciously’, I have also had ideas, about what other consequences might arise, from the router being under the control of somebody else. One thing which may happen, is that this router, which displays no options or information regarding IPv6, may get confused and start dropping clients, over repeated requests for IPv6 addresses.

The Web-interface of this router is a dumbed-down interface, which I can access, but which for my benefit, does not give me deep control over the settings. One thing which remains true however, is that in Canada, there is next to no real use of IPv6 from the side of ISPs.

Now, I have set up an IPv6 gateway, which allows my site to be fetched by way of IPv6 if this is desired. But I have also set up my ‘ip6tables‘ in such a way that any request my Server makes for an IPv6 address, gets routed to this gateway, and not to my physical Ethernet connection. It is only logical. So ‘ping6‘ works gloriously on the Server, but not on my laptop. When I do a ‘ping6‘ on my server-box, I also get to see a graphical display in my ‘gkrellm‘ monitor widget, of activity going out over my ‘teredo‘ virtual NIC, not over my real NIC.

And so I have a somewhat lopsided configuration at home, but one which does what I want it to do.

Dirk

 

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