I have now installed ‘xine’ on my Linux tablet.

In this earlier posting, I had written that I’ve installed Linux on an older tablet of mine, that being my Samsung Galaxy Tab S, First Generation, with only 16GB of storage.

In order to do so, I used the (non-rooted) applications from Google Play, ‘GNURoot’ and ‘XSDL’.

One feature which the author of ‘XSDL’ pointed out, is the fact that we may download a shared library to run under Linux, which when preloaded, makes the shared-memory extension available, for the purpose of running one application. By default pure X-server protocol does not have this, even though any half-decent Linux system has shared memory extension, X-Video extension, and beyond that, ‘vdpau‘, to allow fast video playback.

One Linux application which I had been using this way, was ‘gnome-mplayer’ , for which I had also written a shell-script, that preloads the shared-memory library. The video-player application was launching and running fine, but I’m no longer convinced that it was ever benefiting from shared memory. More specifically, we can set in the preferences of the player application, to use ‘X11′ as its video output-mode, and ‘pulseaudio’ as its audio output-mode.

Literally, selecting X11 in this way, does not mean shared memory as the output-mode, although the player could have bee negotiating with the (fake) X-server over this parameter…

So. To make sure I’d be obtaining the full benefit of shared memory, when playing back video-streams more seriously, I next proceeded to install ‘xine-ui’. It is highly-configurable, in that we can choose shared memory video-output explicitly.

Continue reading I have now installed ‘xine’ on my Linux tablet.