I now have Linux installed on my Google Pixel C tablet.

As the title of this posting suggests.

I used the Android app “UserLAnd“, which does not require root. The most recent versions of this app offer a VNC Server, which emulates an X-Server within the Linux system. And the implementation of VNC is ‘TightVNC’. Plus, the latest versions of this app offer a built-in VNC Viewer, that I find makes the most, out of the tiny icons that display on the high-res screen, as well as out of the fact that often, users will want to operate the GUI with their fingers, along with the physical keyboard that my Pixel C pairs with (:7) …

Screenshot_20190831-163643

The setup of this Linux Guest System is much easier than my earlier experience was because the basic Linux distribution, the desktop manager, and certain apps can all be installed just by tapping on a few icons. And then, using the ‘sudo apt-get’ command-line, additional Debian packages can be installed.

There is an interesting side effect to this project: When I give the command:

$ cat /etc/debian_version

I obtain the result ‘10.0‘. This would mean that the Linux version which I’m getting, is the new Debian / Buster, which none of my PCs nor my Laptop are even running. However, the repositories that I’m subscribed to are labelled ‘stable’. The CPU is an ‘arm64′. And the desktop manager I chose was ‘LXDE’. I installed a full productivity suite, including LaTeX. But, I found that three Linux applications did not run:

  • LyX – The graphical, WYSIWYM LaTeX Editor (:2).
  • Synaptic – A GUI for apt-get that makes it particularly easy to browse package-repositories, before selecting which packages to install.
  • Latexdraw‘ (:1) (:6).

Everything else I tried seems to work, including “LibreOffice”, “GIMP”, “InkScape”, “Firefox ESR”. On my own, without the aid of simple GUI-buttons, I was also able to install and run “Texmaker”, “Dia”, “Xfig”, “OpenClipArt”, “Maxima” and “wxMaxima”, the Computer Algebra System and its Graphics Front-End. Getting that last item to work properly actually required that I install the package ‘fonts-jsmath’.

The Linux Guest System is currently taking up 5.37GB of my internal storage, and I finally also found out how to share files between the Guest System and the Host System. Within the Guest System, if on the Host System the root of the user folders is ‘/root/<sdcard>’, then this Host System root is mounted at ‘/host-rootfs/<sdcard>’ (within the Guest System). This means that I can open a path directly to this folder in the file-manager ‘PCManFM’, and bookmark it. (:3)

(Updated 9/07/2019, 17h40 … )

Continue reading I now have Linux installed on my Google Pixel C tablet.

I’ve just installed LaTeX on my Android / Linux tablet.

In This Posting, I roughly explained how I was able to install Linux on my Samsung Galaxy Tab S.

Since then, the Linux software that I was able to install, and which works, include, among other applications,

  • GIMP
  • Blender
  • LibreOffice (a Comprehensive Install)
  • InkScape
  • GVim
  • MPlayer (Video With Sound)
  • LaTeX
  • LyX (A Word-Processor based on LaTeX, and not quite WYSIWYG)
  • (a Graphical LaTeX Code-Editor)
  • ‘Dia’ (a Useful Diagram-Editor)
  • Miscellaneous Diagram-Drawing Software (that uses LaTeX as a Back-End)
  • wxMaxima (a Computer Algebra System with GUI)
  • GNUPlot (Gives 3D Plots)
  • Yacas (Yet Another Computer Algebra System)
  • ‘mkvtoolnix-gui’ (A video-file concatenation tool)

But, doing so also consumed several GB of storage, even though that tablet only has 16GB of storage. Currently, my Linux guest-system is taking up 4.41GB.

screenshot_2017-09-28-16-23-54

(Updated 10/08/2017 : )

Continue reading I’ve just installed LaTeX on my Android / Linux tablet.

Vysor

Recently, I was looking for apps that would do approximately what ‘Samsung SideSync’ does – which is to allow a remote, VNC-like connection, with our PCs or Laptops as clients, and with the Android device as our Remote Host. But I was looking for solutions that run under Linux, which SideSync does not.

And so another possibility which I ran in to, was This Solution. The main problem with “Vysor”, is that some users don’t understand what it does. It creates a remote session To one’s Android device alright, but by default, requires that we have ADB drivers installed on the PC or Laptop, and that we have a USB cable connecting that computer to our Android…

Actually, The Best Way to access Vysor, is first to install the Chrome Extension, which will act as client. In order for this to work, we first need to make sure that WebGL Is Enabled on our Chrome For Linux.

And then, if we still want to use Vysor, only without the USB cable, we may need to install This Additional App, which acts as an ADB-over-WiFi bridge, on the Android side. On the PC or Laptop side, we nevertheless need to have the ADB drivers installed.

IF we can get all these components to work together, then we’ll also have an Android-session over WiFi, BUT, there is a problem. It represents a security risk. By exposing the full ADB capabilities of our phone to whatever WiFi network, we’d also be allowing other potential hacks to take place.

I did not go as far as described, before deciding that this was less-than-ideal for me. Other people – mainly devs – find this to be a good replacement for the Emulators they’d normally use to debug their Android apps, since it allows those devs to do so, directly via their Android devices. If you have a farm of those…

Dirk