Core Update Tonight, Downtime

This evening, a very deep upgrade was pushed through the package repositories, affecting my computer. This update included 108 packages, included the core C libraries, and converted my Debian 8.6 system into a Debian 8.7 system. Such an update requires we do a reboot, even though we are using Linux.

Because I host my Web-site on my private server at home, this meant that my site and blog were offline from about 22h40 until 22h50. Further, even though my ‘WordPress’ blogging engine has a ‘Maintenance Mode’ window that in can display, this window requires that the Web-server be running to display, while maybe maintenance work could be underway on WordPress itself. Therefore, it was not an option for me to display this, because my whole Apache server was briefly offline.

I hope that this 10-minute interruption did not pose an inconvenience to any of my readers.

Having said all that, it looks on the surface as though the upgrade was a success, and was not botched in any way – thus only the very short reboot interval.

Oh yes. Because my caching daemon was also restarted, the Web-server aspect of this blog will be slightly slow for the next day or so.

Dirk

 

Downtime

This evening the Linux computer which I host this site on, named ‘Phoenix’, received an upgrade to over 60 packages in one shot, including a kernel update and firmware updates.

Even though Linux computers can often install upgrades without requiring a reboot, there are certain types of upgrades which even require a Linux machine to reboot afterward. This was one such upgrade.

Consequently, this blog, and my whole site, was affected from 19h15 until 19h45 this evening.

I apologize for any inconvenience.

Dirk

 

Downtime for an Upgrade

An extensive upgrade to the machine which hosts this Web-server, in which 106 packages were brought up to their new version, took place between 20h25 and 20h45 tonight. Hence, the site would have been unavailable during that time, and because the Web-server itself was offline, it was not possible to display a Maintenance Mode screen, belonging to this blog.

The upgrade took place uneventfully, not breaking anything apparent so far, and leaving the computer fully functional.

Dirk

 

Chrome For Linux Upgrade Glitch Fixed By Google

One of the facts which I had observed about the Google Chrome browser version, which is meant for Linux, was that Google no longer provides a 32-bit version of its binaries. In keeping with this, Google has also removed the section in its code repository, which would make a 32-bit version available. Hence, I can only be subscribing to the 64-bit upgrades. Yet, my Linux computer ‘Phoenix’ has its package manager set up, to query a repository for both the 64-bit and the 32-bit versions of any package by default, and then to download and install the packages which are relevant.

In this earlier posting, I observed how this can lead to an error message when running ‘apt-get update‘. What I had done, was to make minor configuration changes like so, which I had needed to re-apply, after every upgrade to Chrome.

Well Google has caught up with the scenario which I was describing. As of their latest upgrade, their own ‘cron.daily‘ symlink will properly put the following source into ‘/etc/apt/sources.list.d/google-chrome.list‘ :


deb [arch=amd64] http://dl.google.com/linux/chrome/deb/ stable main

You may note, that the script from Google now includes the ‘[arch=amd64]‘ parameter, which means that I won’t have to make any manual adjustments to this configuration detail of my machine, every time the Chrome browser receives an upgrade.

Thank you, Google!

Dirk