The downside of trying to use an Android tablet for Note-Taking.

One of the applications for generic Android tablets which I’ve tried to find solutions to, mainly in the form of apps, would have been, for note-taking. And this quest has largely remained unsatisfied. I’d like to comment on Why.

When I wanted to use my tablet for note-taking, the way I visualized doing this, was to be able to jot down notes by hand, as if on paper. The idea seemed natural, that a tablet could store many pages of notes, without requiring that the user carry with him, stacks of sheets and binders.

But the main impediment I saw with this actually stemmed from the hardware itself, that is sometimes just referred to as the Glass of the tablet, or otherwise, as the Sensor. Most common tablets have a capacitance-based Sensor, which is best-suited, for detecting the proximity of a human fingertip. A necessary variation in its use is, a passive stylus, which does little better, than to focus electrostatic fields, as any shaped, conductive object would. This type of stylus requires no special hardware from the tablet to work, and can also be bought from virtually any manufacturer, and can remain compatible with the standard sensor.

The problem with that which ensues, is the fact that actual software – i.e., apps – try to implement a feature which is called ‘Palm Guard’, ‘Palm Rejection’, or ‘Wrist Guard’. This feature recognizes the fact that when people try to write on any surface, we usually have a tendency to rest the side of our hand on the same surface. The capacitance-based sensors cannot distinguish between contact with a human hand, and the point of the stylus. The ability of the software to make the same distinction is only as effective, as the ability of the sensor to be hugely multi-touch in the ‘contact-map’, that it inputs.

(Updated 12/26/2018, 12h00 : )

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Living in a World of both New And Old Computers

One of the ironies that I notice in my life, is that even though I own both modern Android devices, and older Linux devices, I still get a lot of satisfaction out of ‘tinkering’ with my Linux devices.

I’d say that for most purposes, the more modern – or post-modern – mobile devices truly have become more useful on a practical level. But there are still certain types of tasks which need to be left to the older technologies. And one of the latter would be, to dedicate a machine to act as the host for server-programs, i.e. to use a machine as a server.

Further, even though I’ve had an intense interest in the past in CGI – in Computer Generated Images – I would not say I’m avidly into computer-gaming. I do hold a few player-licenses to video games. But if I was intensely into playing video games, then the Windows machines would start to become indispensable.

Linux just seems to be an ideal platform for servers, but is also surprisingly efficient at multimedia work. And, Linux can be a powerful platform to run CGI. It’s just that Linux gaming is not up to par, mainly for financial reasons. Firstly, the way Debian Linux works tends not to play well, with DRM. And games are after all sold for profit. Secondly, there isn’t a sufficiently high percentage of users based on Linux, really to make it worth the while of major gaming companies.

There have been various ways to integrate some DRM’ed software with Linux constraints, even though Linux is better-associated with its open-source background.

Dirk