USB C Cables / Connectors

The subject may already be familiar to many other people, that there now exists ‘a type of USB connector / plug / jack, with which they do not need to worry, in which direction it’s facing, when they plug it in to a compatible port’. The type of connector I’m referring to is a USB-C connector, which brings with it, USB-C cables, that connect from a Type-A to a Type-C jack.

One fact which I should point out is that even though we live in a relatively modern time, in which we might think that companies can do anything, If it’s also a requirement that they’re supposed to mass-produce equipment cheaply, they can no longer just do anything. The tolerances for a Type-C USB jack are quite small, and manufacturing machines themselves have limits to their precision.

One experience I seem to have made not once but twice, is that when I purchased USB-C cables that were visibly meant for Apple products, they did not seem to snap in to my ‘Google Pixel C’ tablet snugly, the latter of which could also be seen as a kind of Samsung-like, Android product, in direct competition with Apple. I needed to repurchase each time, and then for made-for-Samsung jacks, before those would seem to have a satisfactory fit into my Pixel C.

If we’re forearmed with this observation, we can make sure either to buy USB-C cables made for Apple, or, cables made for Samsung, since there are many suppliers of cables.

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I suppose that a more-nefarious question which some people might have could be: “Did Apple deliberately change their USB-C ports, to make those incompatible with the Android-related ports?’ But my guess at an answer to that question would be ‘No.’

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Why AirDroid holds promise for me, after all.

There exists a higher-quality solution to this need, known as ‘Samsung Side-Sync’. But a big problem in my own desire to use this Android app, is the fact that its client-program is only available for Mac or Windows – while I mainly tend to have Linux installed on my PCs and laptops.

The capability which the app delivers, is to turn the Android device into a type of remote, VNC Host, or Server, on which a client seeks to establish a session, in which the properties and resources of the host, are displayed on the client-computer, remotely, as if the user of the client was in fact sitting in front of the host.

This is not so strange an idea, as various types of VNC / RDP already exist, by which a remote session is created on a Windows or a Linux PC as host, such that the client – even if that client exists as an Android client – can seem to have a remote session.

Because I was intrigued by making the Android device the host for a change, and by the possibility of using a Web-interface as client, I decided to give an app a try, which is called AirDroid. After all, even Linux computers have Web-browsers which would be powerful enough to run as clients.

I installed the app on my up-to-date Google Pixel C Tablet, But was initially disappointed, in the apparent observation, that AirDroid just did not seem stable enough to trust with such an objective.

(Last Updated 08/09/2017 : )

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