Getting Some Software To Run On My Linux Tablet, which Was Not Meant To Run

One of the computing adventures which I’ve been blogging about, is that I’ve been able to install a Linux Guest System, under the Android Host System, on my Samsung Galaxy Tab S, First-Generation tablet. I use the two Android apps, ‘GNURoot’ and ‘XSDL’, which can be obtained from Google Play, and which do not require root.

In this posting, I had as a message to my readers, that certain types of Linux applications are poor candidates for this sort of environment – a chroot-Linux-Shell, that connects externally to an X-server, which in turn seems to provide pure X-server protocol as well as a port, to connect PulseAudio clients to.

But in the same posting, I had named a specific Linux-application, which would solve each of the two purposes, and which in my opinion at the time, might have the best chances to run – assuming that any have a chance to run:

  1. ‘mhWaveEdit’
  2. LiVES

As some of my readers might expect, since that posting, I have nevertheless pressed ahead, and experimented with installing each of these Linux-applications, on the guest-system.

Long story short, I found that mhWaveEdit seems to work fine, and installed effortlessly, while LiVES does not.

screenshot_2017-10-04-01-27-35

One observation which I’ve made, is that the PulseAudio server built-in to the Android app ‘XSDL’, offers sound output, but not sound input. Hence, I cannot connect to the mike, which is built-in to the tablet. But this is a very minor issue, since I’ve exceeded typical usage-scenarios in what I’ve already been able to do.

Continue reading Getting Some Software To Run On My Linux Tablet, which Was Not Meant To Run

The Sort Of Software that will Not Run, on my Linux Tablet

In this posting I wrote, that I had installed Linux in a chroot-environment, on my old Samsung Galaxy Tab S, First Generation tablet, which remains an Android-based tablet. I did this specifically using the apps from the Google play store, named ‘GNURoot’ and ‘XSDL’, which do not require root.

Here, I gave a compendium of Linux-applications which do run in the resulting Linux guest-system.

I think that I need to point out a broad category of Linux applications that will always remain poor choices:

  • Audio Editors,
  • Video Editors.

The problem with any Audio Editor, is that it will eventually need to input and output Audio – not just edit sound files – and any Video Editor, needs to give a preview of all its video-clips – not just edit video files. This seems like a silly thing to write, but is non-trivial in my present context.

I have taken a Linux engine – GNURoot – and connected it to an externally-supplied X-server emulation – XSDL. The pipeline between these two Android apps is very narrow. It consists of X-server protocol – which is excellent and rendering text and GUIs, of shared memory at its maximum, and of a PulseAudio server, visible on the Linux side as such, but collectively running on the Android side as an SDL client.

I have no way to provide OpenGL or SDL on the Linux-side. What this means, is that virtually any non-linear video editor will want to see both installed on the Linux side, while neither is provided.

Continue reading The Sort Of Software that will Not Run, on my Linux Tablet

Update to ‘gstreamer’

Under Debian / Jessie, the standard back-end to the PulseAudio daemon is ‘gstreamer’. This is a set of programs that perform potentially complex sound-processing under Linux, yet have no real GUI as it stands.

In the past week or so, there was an update to this software-subsystem.

I have not rebooted any of my computers since then, nor have I done a simpler user-session-restart. Therefore, I do not yet know whether this update has broken PulseAudio, nor whether it has improved the performance of the audio-daemon, that is standard for KDE, and that definitely has a GUI.

When I find this out, I will comment on it again.

Dirk