How an old problem with multiple (Debian / Linux) sessions seems to require an old fix.

One of the facts which I recently updated my postings with is, that I have the ability to run multiple sessions on one PC, and to switch back and forth between them, by using the key-combinations <Ctrl>+<Alt>+F7, <Ctrl>+<Alt>+F8, etc. According to that update, each session could theoretically use either ‘Plasma 5′, or ‘LXDE’ as its desktop manager, even though I’d choose an actual LXDE session for only one of my defined usernames.

When I was recently testing this ability, I found that a Plasma 5 session which had locked its screen (which I had switched away from), using the built-in Plasma 5 locker, would start to consume 1 CPU core at 100%, as was visible from within the other session. And, it appears that This is a bug which has been known for a long time, on computers that have the proprietary NVIDIA graphics drivers, as my computer named ‘Phosphene’ does. This computer is still based on Debian 9 / Stretch. Apparently, according to common lore, what one is supposed to do about this is, to create a file named such as ‘dirk.sh’ (in my case), in the directory ‘/etc/profile.d’, which is supposed to set two environment variables globally like so:

 

# An attempt to prevent klocker from consuming 1 CPU core 100%
# when multiple desktop sessions are active...

export KWIN_TRIPLE_BUFFER=1
export __GL_YIELD="USLEEP"

 

Unfortunately, this backfired on me when I tried to implement it, in that regardless of which way I tried to do so, ‘kwin’ would just crash in the session that’s supposed to be using ‘Plasma 5′. An additional mystery I ran in to was, that my attempts to set ‘__GL_YIELD’ would simply get reset somewhere, unless I had also set ‘KWIN_TRIPLE_BUFFER’. Only if I set both, would setting either reveal as successful, using an ‘echo $…’ command. (:1)  Therefore, what I really needed to do was, to turn off the Screen-Locking which is provided by Plasma 5 itself (for both my usernames), and to install and use ‘xscreensaver’ instead. However, doing that has two obvious caveats:

  • Under Debian 10 / Buster and later, ‘xscreensaver’ is no longer fully supported, unless one also reconfigured the new, Wayland display manager to act as an X-server proxy, And
  • Even when I apply this fix, which means that I’ve completely disabled ‘klocker’ in my settings, at the moment I tell Plasma 5 to launch a new, parallel session, foregoing-which causes <Ctrl>+<Alt>+F8 just to lead to a blank screen, Plasma 5 will lock the current session – Using ‘klocker’ again, and causing 100% CPU usage to become visible, again, from the second session.

What I find is that, once I’ve used my Plasma 5 session to create a parallel session, I need to switch to the first session once, using <Ctrl>+<Alt>+F7, and unlock that one. After that, both my Plasma 5 sessions will only lock themselves, using ‘xscreensaver’. And aside from that short, crucial interval, I haven’t seen 100% CPU-core usage again.


 

I should add that, for certain purposes, I sometimes choose only to install the CPU-rendered ‘xscreensaver’ packages, and deliberately do not install the hardware-accelerated ones. And in this case, the hardware-accelerated screensavers were omitted, simply because they could start running the busy-wait loop again, only this time, when invoked by ‘xscreensaver’.

(Update 3/24/2021, 13h55… )

Continue reading How an old problem with multiple (Debian / Linux) sessions seems to require an old fix.

OGRE 1.11.5 Working on ‘Phosphene’

One of the open-source software projects which has often fascinated me, is called OGRE, which stands for Open-Source Graphics Rendering Engine. It’s a very powerful set of libraries, that allows good coders to design 3D graphics applications, which take full advantage of hardware-accelerated – i.e., GPU-based – rendering, of virtual 3D scenes designed by such users, into simulated 2D camera views, within the same scene. This is one of the most common modes in which 3D Graphics is operated.

One of the things that OGRE is not, is a full-fledged game engine unto itself. This is due to:

  • Lack of sound implementation (Additionally linking applications to the SDL Library may solve that),
  • Lack of scripting support, without some sort of add-on. I think I compiled it with Python support, which would supply scripting, if my coding was good enough.

Modern builds of OGRE break with the past, in that they no longer use ‘OIS’ as their input system. Instead, at least their Sample Browser uses the ‘SDL library’ to do the same.

One of the feats which I have now accomplished on the computer named ‘Phosphene’, which is a Debian / Stretch, Debian 9 system, was to compile version 1.11.5 of this engine because I’m curious about Game Design, which I have been for a long time. And one of the reasons I feel that this software is stable on Phosphene, is due to the information which I already provided in This past posting. The past posting announced observations which I made, when this same hardware was called the computer ‘Plato’, but already running Debian Stretch.

What my observation essentially suggests is, that running 3D, OpenGL applications can in fact break the compositor because they suspend it, but that there is a work-around.

(Updated 2/20/2019, 19h00 … )

Continue reading OGRE 1.11.5 Working on ‘Phosphene’

(Solved) How the Latest Wine-Staging Release, for Debian, Introduces a Packaging Problem: Unresolved Dependencies.

One piece of software which many Linux users benefit from is called “Wine”, which is an acronym that stands for ‘Wine Is Not an Emulator’ . This software allows some Windows programs to run under Linux, but has recently been made more powerful, to allow graphics-intensive games to run as well. The version of wine which I’ve been subscribing to is called ‘wine-staging’ , and contains the latest, bleeding-edge features that Wine is to contain, at any later point down the road.

But as I’ve been receiving updates to wine-staging, the latest update would have taken all my computers from version 4.0-rc2, to version 4.0-rc4, which means, ‘…Release Candidate 4′ . At that point, some of my computers could not install the update, because of unresolved package dependencies.

Apparently what’s been happening with Wine-Staging is twofold:

  1. The original maintainers are no longer running the project, which also means that Wine is in the midst of a Code Freeze, and that present updates may offer fewer or no new features, from what Linux users are used to, and
  2. In the interest of allowing the Windows games with the highest graphics requirements to run (potentially), the devs have nevertheless created a dependency of the latest Wine packages, on the OpenCL packages that install OpenCL natively under Linux.

‘OpenCL’ is a user-side API, which also requires system-side drivers for the specific graphics hardware, and which allows greatly parallel computations to be carried out on the GPU, instead of on the CPU. Apparently, some games use either ‘OpenCL’ or ‘CUDA’ these days, in order to incorporate complex Physics simulations into the game.

(I will assume that the version of CUDA which Wine emulates, requires OpenCL to be installed on the side of Linux.)

The problem under Debian which I’ve detected is, that the newly-introduced dependency of ‘wine-staging-amd64′ (as an example) is simply mainly:

‘ocl-icd-libopencl1′

Which means, that Wine will now insist on using the generic OpenCL drivers, that were developed for and by the Linux community, while not allowing the use of proprietary OpenCL drivers, that are closed-source, and that were developed by the manufacturers of each graphics card.

The problem with this is, that as users, we may only have one or the other OpenCL driver-set installed. We cannot install both the generic and the proprietary drivers. When we try to update Wine-Staging now, doing so will try to install the package above, which will also try to ‘kick out’ , any proprietary packages we may have installed, that provide OpenCL.

Continue reading (Solved) How the Latest Wine-Staging Release, for Debian, Introduces a Packaging Problem: Unresolved Dependencies.

xscreensaver Bug With Latest Proprietary nVidia Graphics Drivers

As described in this posting, I have just applied a major software-update to the computer I name ‘Plato’, in which I replaced its open-source graphics drivers, with the proprietary nVidia drivers, suitable for its graphics card, and for its Linux-build.

That would be drivers version ‘375.82-1~deb9u1′ , from the package manager, for a ‘Debian 9.4′ system.

I have just noticed a major bug, which other people should know about, before they also decide to go with the proprietary drivers. They tend to cause some malfunction with OpenGL-based ‘xscreensaver’ screen-savers, version ‘5.36-1′ .

The bug seems to be, that if I use the graphical configuration tool to preview several screen-savers, when I switch from one screen-saver to another, the previous GL-screen-saver being previewed fails to terminate, which in turn causes the configuration window to freeze, so that the next-chosen screen-saver cannot be previewed. A small blank rectangle takes its place, in the configuration window. When this happens, I actually need to ‘kill -9′ the screen-saver-process – belonging to the screen-saver in question and not ‘/usr/bin/xscreensaver’ – the former of which is taking up 100% of 1 CPU core with nice-time, before I can continue previewing screen-savers.

The problem with this as I see it is, it could also happen after the screen-saver has locked the screen, and when I have entered my password to unlock it. The mere fact that I was always able to unlock one GL-based screen-saver in the past was good in itself, but may only have been luck! The strangeness with which my bug seems to differ from other users’ bug-reports, is that when my OpenGL-based screen-saver was rendering to the root window – i.e., to the whole screen – it did exit properly when unlocked by me.

So as it currently stands, I have set my screen-saver on the computer ‘Plato’, to just a blank screen… :-(

At the same time, OpenGL applications seem to run just fine, like this example, just tested:

screenshot_20180430_142338

However, since the description of the screen-saver packages in the package manager states “GL(Mesa)” screen-savers, it may be better just to ‘remove’ the ‘xscreensaver-gl’ and ‘xscreensaver-gl-extra’ packages.

I found out, that this bug also affects ‘rss-glx 0.9.1-6.1′ .

(Updated 04/30/2018, 19h25 … )

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