A Word Of Warning about Using tsMuxer And Certain UDF Versions

I have written numerous postings, to guide myself as well as anybody else who might be interested, on the subject of Video-DVD burning, as well as on the subject of Video-Blu-ray burning. According to advice which I gave, it’s possible to use a program named “tsMuxerGUI”, to create the Blu-ray File Structure, which a Blu-ray playback-device will play.

According to additional advice I gave, it’s possible to burn these Blu-rays using some version of ISO-13346, which is also known as ‘UDF’, as opposed to burning them with ISO-9660, as the File System with which data is encoded on the disk.

But what I have noticed, is that certain Blu-rays which were burned in this way, will not play back using the application “VLC”. Normally, the open-source player named VLC can play back Blu-rays, which were commercially produced. So, it would seem natural, that we’d want to test our Blu-rays on the computer we used to create them, with the VLC application as the playback system.

My own experience has been, that the Blu-rays which result play back fine on my Sony Blu-ray playback-device, but do not open on VLC, on my computers.

As unlikely as this may seem, I did after all return to the conclusion, that I’ve created two UDF-encoded Blu-rays, which VLC cannot read, because of the customized UDF-encoding.

Apparently, when we instruct VLC to play a disk inserted into a specific Blu-ray drive, such as perhaps ‘/dev/sr1′, VLC expects to connect directly with the drive, rather than to use the mount-point exclusively, which Linux can create for us.

This is somewhat bewildering, because by default, I need to mount the disk in question, as a regular user, which we can do from the notification tray, before VLC is capable of playing it. But then, whether VLC can in fact read the Blu-ray turns into an independent question, from whether Linux was able to mount it for the rest of the computer to use.

(Edit 10/23/2017 :

There is an even more improbable-sounding possibility, as to why this actually happens. It may be that VLC expects to be able to access the Media Key Block of an inserted Blu-ray Disk, in order to decrypt that, and to start playing back DRM-ed Blu-rays. This would require not only raw access to the disk, but also that such a Block be present on the disk.

If I translate this problem into Human Logic, I’ll get, that ‘VLC’ is only capable of playing Blu-rays that have DRM, when those Blu-rays are also ISO9660-compatible. This may be unfortunate, because even though UDF 2.50 is still not ‘the law of the land’, ISO9660-compatibility may be phased out one day, while DRM likely will not be. )

But there is a workaround. VLC includes in its menus, the ability to Play A Directory. We can choose this option, and can navigate to the mount-point, which we created when we mounted the disk from the notification tray. That mount-point should exist under the directory ‘/media’ , have ‘BDMV’ as one of its sub-folders. And when we then direct VLC to play the folder, that is the parent folder to the ‘BDMV’ sub-folder, we are in fact directing it to play the root-folder of the disk.

And in my own, recent experience, VLC is then able to play the disk. I specifically took care, not to direct VLC to play the folder on my HD, from which I created one of the Blu-rays, but rather the folder that is the mount-point of an actually-inserted disk. Because, it would be pointless to conduct a test, which physically bypasses the disk.

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