Core Update Tonight, Downtime

This evening, a very deep upgrade was pushed through the package repositories, affecting my computer. This update included 108 packages, included the core C libraries, and converted my Debian 8.6 system into a Debian 8.7 system. Such an update requires we do a reboot, even though we are using Linux.

Because I host my Web-site on my private server at home, this meant that my site and blog were offline from about 22h40 until 22h50. Further, even though my ‘WordPress’ blogging engine has a ‘Maintenance Mode’ window that in can display, this window requires that the Web-server be running to display, while maybe maintenance work could be underway on WordPress itself. Therefore, it was not an option for me to display this, because my whole Apache server was briefly offline.

I hope that this 10-minute interruption did not pose an inconvenience to any of my readers.

Having said all that, it looks on the surface as though the upgrade was a success, and was not botched in any way – thus only the very short reboot interval.

Oh yes. Because my caching daemon was also restarted, the Web-server aspect of this blog will be slightly slow for the next day or so.

Dirk

 

I use WordPress.org, not WordPress.com, for most of what I subscribe to.

I think it is a bit my own fault, for not explaining in a clear way, what the difference is between WordPress.com and WordPress.org .

WordPress.com is a specialized blog-hosting site, on which members can write their blogs, but which runs on professionally-maintained servers, by WordpRess.com .

But, the people behind this service have also made the PHP Scripts available for free, that run on the server, and that cause the HTML to be generated, which causes proper WordPress blogs to appear on the browser of the reader. People may download those, and may upload them to whatever Web-server they have access to, provided that that Web-hosting service, also supports the running of server-side scripts, by the Web-hosting service members. Some Web-hosting services put a lot of restrictions on what their members may publish, such as static HTML Pages only, or such as no access to any MySQL server, the latter of which WordPress.org uses actually to store the blogs.

And so, because this support-factor is the main part of the expenses incurred by WordPress.com, I will assume that sharing their core scripts poses no perceived threat to them. Their main expense is not, that core set of PHP Scripts. But, because an individual may have problems setting all this up as well, there is an associated Web-site, namely WordPress.org, where independently-hosted WordPress users can go for tech support, and to download plug-ins.

Continue reading I use WordPress.org, not WordPress.com, for most of what I subscribe to.

The Blog will be a little slow for the next few hours or day…

In the way I have set up WordPress.org, it makes use of a caching daemon named ‘Memcached‘, that runs on my server and speeds up the fetching of specific, frequently-requested content. This is not to be confused with whatever cache is also speeding up your browser.

As part of a routine set of updates fed through my package manager this evening, this daemon also received an update, which required that it be restarted. As a result, the cache is now cleared, and the fetching of the favorite postings to the readers will be somewhat slow for the next few hours, or maybe even for a whole day.

I apologize if this inconveniences anybody.

Also, this behavior does not represent any sort of malfunction, either by the daemon, nor in the update process. All the updates seemed to go through just fine.

Dirk

 

Reboot, Downtime

I host my Web-site on my private computer at home, the one I name ‘Phoenix’. This is different from how most Web-sites today are hosted.

Phoenix received a kernel-update today by way of the package manager, which also required a routine reboot. As a result, my Web-site would have been inaccessible from about 20h05 to 20h15.

Also, I could not have posted a notification on my actual blog, indicating Maintenance Mode, because to output such a message would at least require that the server itself be running. Yet, there has been no real disruption to my Web-server, outlasting this reboot.

I apologize for any inconvenience.

Dirk